CORONAVIRUS INFO PROVIDED BY DR. JIM HARRIS – 4/30/2020

April 30, 2020

An immunologist was being asked about early animal studies with King Corona Vaccine Potions said, “Well yes, promising, but we have a saying in drug research: “Mice lie, and Monkeys exaggerate.”

HARRISON COUNTY COVID CASES FROM JUDGE SMITH
April 29, 2020 – Today we have 7 new cases to report in Harrison County. That brings our cumulative total to 95. We also had 5 recoveries reported bringing total recovered cases to 13. Removing the recoveries and 7 deaths leaves us with 75 active, confirmed cases.

22 Cases of Covid at Tyson Plant in Carthage, Texas
https://www.marshallnewsmessenger.com/eedition/page-a2/page_9af990f2-96c8-536e-9e69-fc195226a99b.html

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TEXAS COVID COUNT
https://txdshs.maps.arcgis.com/apps/opsdashboard/index.html#/ed483ecd702b4298ab01e8b9cafc8b83

SHREVEPORT COVID REPORT FROM WEDNESDAY
The Louisiana Department of Public Health reported the number of coronavirus cases increased in Caddo Parish from 1,497 on Tuesday to 1,525 on Wednesday.
Bossier Parish cases increased from 277 on Tuesday to 285 on Wednesday. Bossier increased from 13 to 15 deaths.
Caddo Parish’s COVID-19 death count reached 110 on , the Caddo Parish Coroner’s office reported. The first Caddo Parish coronavirus death occurred March 24.

https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/
Fascinating Covid statistics that may surprise you. This site can keep you busy for hours.
Could it be that South Korea is doing better than Harrison County? Take a look.

Genetic Engineering Could Make a COVID-19 Vaccine in Months Rather Than Years
A very readable introduction to various vaccines. Take your time. Relax. You will not be graded. 


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CORONAVIRUS INFO PROVIDED BY DR. JIM HARRIS – 4/28/2020

April 28, 2020

Judge Sims Monday report:

April 27, 2020 – We’ve been notified of 4 additional cases today bringing our cumulative total to 83 COVID-19 cases in Harrison County. Removing the deaths & recoveries, we have 70 active cases.

Judge Sims recommends the following article by the respected author, Peggy Noonan:

What Comes After the Coronavirus Storm? 

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Water Quality Could Be Altered in Buildings Closed During COVID-19 Pandemic. While restaurants, gyms, schools and other buildings are closed indefinitely to prevent the spread of COVID-19, the quality of water left sitting in pipes could change. In buildings nationwide, water left sitting for long periods of time could contain excessive amounts of heavy metals and pathogens that are concentrated in pipes, say researchers who have begun a field study on the impact of the pandemic shutdown on buildings. (NSF, 4/21/20)

In Race for a Coronavirus Vaccine, an Oxford Group Leaps Ahead

“…scientists (ENGLISH) at the university’s Jenner Institute had a head start on a vaccine, having proved in previous trials that similar inoculations — including one last year against an earlier coronavirus — were harmless to humans.

“That has enabled them to leap ahead and schedule tests of their new coronavirus vaccine involving more than 6,000 people by the end of next month, hoping to show not only that it is safe, but also that it works.

“The Oxford scientists now say that with an emergency approval from regulators, the first few million doses of their vaccine could be available by September — at least several months ahead of any of the other announced efforts — if it proves to be effective.

“Scientists (AMERICAN) at the National Institutes of Health’s Rocky Mountain Laboratory in Montana last month inoculated six rhesus macaque monkeys with single doses of the Oxford vaccine. The animals were then exposed to heavy quantities of the virus that is causing the pandemic — exposure that had consistently sickened other monkeys in the lab. But more than 28 days later all six were healthy, said Vincent Munster, the researcher who conducted the test.”

Live updates: House leaders abandon plans to return next week; U.S. coronavirus cases near 1 million—So if it’s too dangerous for the US House of Representatives to meet in disease ravaged Washington, why is Texas relaxingp crowd rules? I consider gatherings of people in Harrison County to be dangerous and will likely set up back in attempts to limit the virus spread. JHarris

Dr. Phillip Rozeman: Looking ahead with realistic expectations as we come out of COVID-19 (also on Facebook) I don’t know this Shreveport doctor, but I plan to look him up. This is a well thought out, realistic, assessment of what comes next in this area. JHarris

Over the last few weeks, we have watched the global pandemic and economic recession unfold on our television and computer screens. The phrase “flattening the curve” has become a part of most people’s vocabulary and tragic videos from hospitals and emergency rooms in New York City and Northern Italy are on all channels.

Prentiss Smith wrote in The Times, “People are afraid. People are anxious.” Those emotions are amplified by uncertainty about expectations. So what can we realistically expect over the next couple of months?

First, we can expect health systems will continue to provide relief to patients suffering from the complications of the COVID-19 virus. Leaders from Gov. John Bel Edwards down to health system leaders will continue to spend their time thinking ahead – anticipating problems and developing solutions. Local physicians will continue to modify treatment protocols based on the best thinking of experienced people across the globe. Pharmaceuticals and clinical research will continue to develop new treatments, testing, and vaccines for COVID-19.

We can expect to continue to put into practice some form of social distancing and protective face covering until an effective vaccine has been developed and people inoculated. These efforts are relatively easy and have been effective in reducing transmission of this and many other viruses. Social distancing has been effective in flattening the curve of the virus in our community.

We can expect different prevalences of COVID-19 in different regions of the country and significant differences in the number of cases in different neighborhoods within the same community. As a result, restart efforts will be done at different rates in different communities. The COVID-19 virus will not magically disappear and be replaced by a roaring economy by the end of May. We will have a new normal for a while. Absolute victory over COVID-19 will come only with a curative treatment, vaccine, or widespread immunity in the community.

We can expect a substantial reduction of complications of the virus if we concentrate significant efforts on reducing the spread of the virus in elderly people with chronic disease and people in high risk areas of our community. Aggressively managing high risk subsets (like done in nursing homes and the Caddo Parish Commission testing van to high risk neighborhoods) not only reduces risk in that subset but speeds the safe reopening of the economy and lowers the incidence of a second wave of COVID-19.

We can expect schools will open this fall. Children have a very very low risk of complications of the virus. We need to be ready with whatever resources to mitigate the transmission of the virus between children and elderly relatives and friends.

We can expect the development of benchmark health criteria to guide local decision-making in dealing with the health and economic crisis. These benchmark guidelines (new cases, COVID testing results, hospitalizations, ventilators) are vital to judge the speed of modifying stay at home, business opening, and social distancing policies.

We can expect loosening social distancing strategies could result in some rebound of the virus. Flattening the curve does not mean the curve goes away. The key in each community is maintaining these rebounds as small blips and not a significant wave that swamps the health systems. It is the reason for continued monitoring of health indicators; continued social distancing efforts; and continued willingness to be flexible and modify course as the future unfolds.

We can expect tension between efforts to control the illness and restart our economy. This tension between two very important issues is predictable and handling that tension will require leaders to acknowledge that personal perspectives are different. This difference in perspective may be based on everything from individual tolerance of risk to individual personal experience with the pandemic, health risk, and economic situation. As noted by Louisiana Sen. John Kennedy, we “need to save both lives and livelihoods.” We must do both.

We can expect widespread testing to be a focus in reopening the economy. Health officials and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce are calling for expanding testing. Right now, this robust and widespread testing strategy can’t be delivered as envisioned since there are not enough tests for everyone to have ongoing testing.

In addition, there are warnings from scientists over what tests are accurate as well as questions about the degree of immunity conveyed by antibodies. For now, we need to develop a plan that does not depend too heavily on testing everyone. We will implement the plan and monitor progress and add new testing provisions as they are developed.

We can expect there will be no silver bullet solutions for reopening the economy. Ripping off the band-aid is not the best approach. A graduated approach better serves our community. We can expect businesses, Chambers of Commerce, local government, faith-based and nonprofit leaders to have a big hand in implementing restart efforts. Along the way, consideration will be given to long-term reimagining efforts in our state and community. Could Shreveport-Bossier benefit from moving pharmaceutical and critical supply chain manufacturing back to the United States?

We can expect that the reinstitution of long-term strict stay at home and temporary business closure strategies will result in the same outcomes for the economy as noted in the initial use of this strategy. We simply cannot afford another round of massive unemployment. This means we have to work together to prevent a second wave of the pandemic.

In the meantime, we can expect doctors, nurses, and respiratory therapists to continue to care for those with COVID-19 with skill and compassion. We can expect small business owners to help their employees more than they can really afford to help. We can expect volunteers to work 18 hours a day at food banks.

We can continue to expect random acts of kindness to be numerous. People overcoming fear and anxiety. People expressing love for each other. People caring for each other. People working together. People building a greater future for our community and nation.

Dr. Phillip Rozeman is a practicing cardiologist. He is past board char of the Greater Shreveport Chamber, Blueprint Louisiana, and Northwest Louisiana Medical Society.

EXTENSIVE LIST OF NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF MEDICINE C-19 ARTICLES:

The following articles are now available on NEJM.org. For more articles and other resources on the Covid-19 outbreak, visit NEJM.org/coronavirus

Marshall Makes Necessary Budgetary Adjustments

[Marshall, Texas, April 27, 2020]

[Marshall, Texas] As the City of Marshall prepares for the full effect of the coronavirus (COVID-19) and its impact on city revenues, the city will furlough eleven full-time and five part-time employees within destination-related city departments currently impacted by COVID-19 community safeguards. To further the savings, the city intends to freeze the hiring of any open positions within all City of Marshall departments.

The City of Marshall is utilizing furloughs to protect the city’s financial condition yet maintain a level of support to employees impacted, through no fault of their own.

In addition to the furloughs, the city is reducing total expenses utilizing Hotel Occupancy Tax (HOT) Funds, some $250,000 from the 2020 budget.

City Manager Mark Rohr said, “We hope these adjustments are temporary, but we have got to keep a close eye on city revenues to make sure we meet our obligations. We will continue to monitor the fallout to determine if further modifications are necessary to meet the essential city services to citizens and our debt payments.”

In 2020, the City of Marshall will have a debt payment due to $362,000 for Memorial City Hall. A significant budget shortfall in HOT funds could cause a default on that debt payment and further impact the taxpayers of the City of Marshall. Rohr added, “These moves are an attempt to prevent that from occurring.”

It is imperative for the City of Marshall to get on the front end of this financial shortfall as we have already seen a projected 50% reduction in HOT Funds from March and a 10% reduction in sales tax for April. We anticipate the sales tax revenue and HOT revenue to drop further in the coming months based on the community COVID-19 safeguards implemented. “Ultimately, our goal is to be proactive to stabilize our budget and maintain the highest quality of city services, while impacting the fewest number of employees,” stated City Manager Mark Rohr.

CORONAVIRUS INFO PROVIDED BY DR. JIM HARRIS – 4/27/2020

April 27, 2020

No reports in yet for 27 April C-19 cases in Marshall or East Texas at 1500. 

Mink found to have coronavirus on two Dutch farms: ministry

Two mink farms in the Netherlands have been put into quarantine after animals were found to be infected with the new coronavirus, the agriculture ministry said on Sunday, urging people to report any other likely cases in the animals. 

The Real Reason to Wear a Mask

“…in Hong Kong, only four confirmed deaths due to COVID-19 have been recorded since the beginning of the pandemic, despite high density, mass transportation, and proximity to Wuhan. Hong Kong’s health authorities credit their citizens’ near-universal mask-wearing as a key factor (surveys show almost 100 percent voluntary compliance). Similarly, Taiwan ramped up mask production early on and distributed masks to the population, mandating their use in public transit and recommending their use in other public places — a recommendation that has been widely complied with. The country continues to function fully, and their schools have been open since the end of February, while their death total remains very low, at only six. In the Czech Republic, masks were not used during the initial outbreak, but after a grassroots campaign led to a government mandate on March 18, masks in public became ubiquitous. The results took a while to be reflected in the official statistics: The first five days of April still saw an average of 257 new cases and nine deaths per day, but the most recent five days of data show an average of 120 new cases and five deaths per day. Of course, we can’t know for sure to what degree these success stories are due to masks, but we do know that in every region that has adopted widespread mask-wearing, case and death rates have been reduced within a few weeks.

“We know a vaccine may take years, and in the meantime, we will need to find ways to make our societies function as safely as possible. Our governments can and should do much — make tests widely available, fund research, ensure medical workers have everything they need. But ordinary people are not helpless; in fact, we have more power than we realize. Along with keeping our distance whenever possible and maintaining good hygiene, all of us wearing just a cloth mask could help stop this pandemic in its tracks.” 

WHO COVID-19 Situation Report for April 26

See chart with each country. Note, most all countries have many, many new cases daily. We have a long way to gl. Texas has >1000 new cases a day.  On Friday, April 24, the US CDC reported 37,144 new cases, the country’s highest daily total since the onset of the pandemic. On April 26, the CDC reported 928,619 total cases (32,853 new from the previous day). I hope Marshall’s new cases will be down, but based on what I saw from my car with the crowding of customers I saw as several stores over the weekend, I’m worried about our situation.

IT AIN’T OVER ‘TILL IT’S OVER. STAY SAFE. STAY HOME. WEAR MASKS AND GLOVES IF YOU HAVE TO GO OUT. RELIABLE TESTS ARE BECOMING AVAILABLE AS ARE CASE TRACKING TECHNIQUES — AND GOOD FOLKS ARE WORKING ON THE VACCINE. THERE IS NOTHING HAPPENING THAT WON’T BE SOLVED.

NEW TESTING INFORMATION FROM HOPKINS:

Developing a National Strategy for Serology (Antibody Testing) in the United States

TESTS FOR C-19 (CORONAVIRUS, COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2)—my attempt to simplify:

1.     IMMEDIATE OR PCR OR ANTIGEN or MOLECULAR TESTS—Might show if you now have or have recently had C-19?

“Molecular tests detect the pathogen while it is circulating in the body, and they are used to diagnose and/or confirm cases for clinical treatment or surveillance purposes. Molecular tests may also detect fragments of the pathogen before it is fully cleared from the body, even if the pathogen is no longer able to replicate or cause disease.”

2.     ANTIBODY OR SEROLOGY TEST — Did you have C-19 and develop a protein that might give you some immunity against C-19?

“Serological tests—or “antibody tests”—on the other hand, detect evidence of the body’s immune response to an infection, which can provide information on both current and prior infection. Serological tests provide the capability to detect infections after the immune system has successfully eliminated the pathogen.” 

Serological tests facilitate identification of asymptomatic SARSCoV2 infection in Wuhan, China (Journal of Medical Virology

This study is valuable because of about 1400 people in China who had not been sick and who wanted to go back to work, about 10% of them showed serological evidence of prior C-19 disease.

(This is a poorly written article and difficult to read)


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CORONAVIRUS INFO PROVIDED BY DR. JIM HARRIS – 4/25/2020

April 25, 2020

MARSHALL/HARRISON COUNTY COVID REPORT FROM JUDGE CHAD SIMS FOR FRIDAY:
April 24, 2020 – We have 8 new positives to report today for a total of 71 cases (remove the 7 deaths & 6 recoveries leaves 58 active cases). Even as the Governor is relaxing some of the restrictions, specifically on retail stores, we must continue to take strong precautions to prevent the spread. I know that wearing a mask is odd and uncomfortable, but for your protection and others around you, please make it a habit… just like putting on your seatbelt.
Don’t forget about the testing site set up for tomorrow at the Marshall Convention Center (see attachment).
Potential for bad weather this evening too, so keep an eye on it.

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Note Fewer New Cases For Most Areas Recently, But Harrison County Has 7 New Cases.

SHREVEPORT:As of Friday, the Louisiana Department of Public Health reports that Caddo Parish coronavirus cases increased from 1,389 on Thursday to 1,407 on Friday,
Caddo Parish has more than 100 COVID-19 deaths as of Friday, the Caddo Parish Coroner’s office reports. There now are 101 parish residents who have died from the novel coronavirus. The first Caddo Parish coronavirus death occurred March 24. The average age of decedents is 70.5 with the youngest age 22, the oldest 96. This tally lists 44 black males, 29 black females, 16 white females and 12 white males.
Bossier Parish increased from 255 on Thursday to 258 on Friday. Bossier Parish has 12 deaths related to COVID-19 as of Thursday.

YOUNG AND MIDDLE-AGED PEOPLE, BARELY SICK WITH COVID-19, ARE DYING FROM STROKES
Many researchers suspect strokes in covid-19 patients may be a direct consequence of blood problems that are producing clots all over some people’s bodies.
(THIS IS A GOOD REASON TO CONTINUE AVOIDING PEOPLE, WEARING MASKS, AND GLOVES—THESE ARE YOUNG PEOPLE HAVING STROKES RELATED TO C-19)
Isolating the Sick at Home, Italy Stores Up Family Tragedies
Personal Comment, JHarris: In China, the C-19 victims were and are isolated and quarantined in special facilities while their contacts were tracked, and their disease ameliorated, or they died. In Italy, on the other hand, the ill stayed at home with all their family members who frequently became ill and not infrequently, died. The above article looks at both places.
What are we doing and what will we do in the future in the US? It looks like we are most often on our own — starting at the family level, then the neighborhood area, city, county, state, regional, and national levels. Depending on location, treatment and follow-up should including tracking and preventative measures. However, procedures might be and are considerably different from one place to another. Hopefully, by the time vaccinations are available, the US will be better organized.
Hopefully, we will soon have adequate tests, trackers, effective medications, and the needed vaccinations. But it will take time. In the meantime, segregation and isolation of the ill should generate less viral disease, less illness, and less death. I doubt that the US will ever settle on just one program. We are too diverse, too blindered, and way too numerous.
We are fortunate in this country to have health care workers who are willing to take monumental personal risks despite chaotic political and medical leadership. We are fortunate to have good, sometimes great, medical institutions, including those of the VA and Military.
We are fortunate to have lots of “Indians,” because we damn sure have too many “Chiefs,” and departments, and agencies and centers and organizations and services and generals. We need efficient medical and political leadership, at every level. We don’t need any more daily “dog and pony” shows.
More than likely, when this is ended, we will have a single payor medical system as well. 


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THREE C’S

By George Smith

Three C’s that drive the Trump administration’s policies and agenda:

Consternation.

Chaos.

Cray-cray.

The president, the Exalted Whim Master, creates chaos for his staff, party and the nation with his serial dishonesty, constant mental meddling in medical matters and his belief that the world’s richest country can be run like a reality television show. His erratic actions have angered long-time allies around the world and have caused more in-White House turnover of key staff members than pancakes at a Waffle House.

Those that blindly follow this mental-breakdown-waiting-to-happen will, at some level (if they are attached to reality at any level) will have a WHOA! moment, a blast of clarity when they realize the man they once believed was ordained by God to be president is, in fact, on the downhill side of cray-cray.

The diagnosis is in … Trump is a sociopath with delusions of grandeur, a man devoid of normal human emotions. Unable to show empathy, he has, in his words and actions, placed dollar signs and stock market numbers ahead of human life.

Those that believe COVID19 is a hoax or akin to the regular flu and that the president is the best person to deal with the pandemic are delusional fools 

If almost four years under the switcheroo policies of this president and his cast of boot-licking lackeys has not taught citizens that ABT (Anybody But Trump) has to be the choice in the 2020 general election, there is no hope to salvage their mental stability.

There is nothing the president can do to salvage his reputation as the worst president in the country’s history.

Those who voted for him in 2016 still have an opportunity to “come to the light”, so to speak, and right a historical General Election mistake by choosing a reasonable choice for president in November rather that the political equivalent of the “Seed of Chucky”.

In your heart, you know it’s time. Past time, even.


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Marshall and Harrison County Heighten COVID-19 Response

[Marshall, Texas, April 24, 2020]

The City of Marshall and Harrison County have remained on alert to safeguard the health of our community members as we face the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic together. To that end, the Marshall Police Officers, Health Inspector, and Fire Marshal have been on inspections to verify compliance with the Amended Declarations of Local Disaster and Public Health Emergency Due to a Communicable Disease. While it is their goal to ensure that everyone remains peaceful and follows the orders, the Marshall Police Department has made numerous warnings and three arrests due to significant violations. The Fire Marshal has also issued multiple warnings and closed nonessential businesses who failed to agree to close.

The City of Marshall and Harrison County asks all residents and businesses to follow the CDC, Governor Abbott’s Executive Orders, and Local Declarations of Local Disaster and Public Health Emergency Due to a Communicable Disease. Your health, the safety of your family, and the stability of our economy are our highest concerns. As your local government leaders, we cannot accomplish these goals without your immediate compliance. The Marshall Police Department, Harrison County Sherriff’s Department, the Health Inspector, and the Fire Marshal will continue inspections with warnings, fines and jail time if orders are not followed.

At the request of the Emergency Management Team, the City of Marshall and Harrison County request all businesses in Harrison County implement the following two guidelines. First, businesses should assign a safety monitor at the entrance to maintain social distance, to ensure that best-hygiene practices are in place and to limit the number of shoppers entering the store. Second, businesses should limit occupancy within their stores to 5 persons per 1000 square feet, with a maximum of 450 people. This maximum number of shoppers shall be posted on the front door.

The City of Marshall and Harrison County have seen a significant increase in positive COVID-19 tests in recent days. Therefore, The City of Marshall and Harrison County will work together to increase enforcement.

Third Amended Declarations of Local Disaster and Public Health Emergency Due to a Communicable Disease

The new local orders stipulate that retail establishments will be able to operate as “Retail-to-Go” as delineated in the Texas Governor’s Executive Order GA-16, effective April 24, 2020. “Retail-to-Go” was defined by Governor Abbott as a safe, strategic reopening of select services and activities in Texas. This order establishes a temporary “Retail-To-Go” model that will allow select retail outlets in Texas to reopen beginning Friday, April 24. Under this model, reopened establishments are required to deliver items to customer’s cars, homes, or other locations to minimize contact. Customer admittance in the store will not be allowed under this provision.

In addition, the new local orders will require every Harrison County food establishment to have all employees wear a face mask at all times. In transactions with customers, cash handling functions and food serving functions are also required to be handled by separate employees.

Citizens are urged to follow following the Centers for Disease Control’s (CDC) national guidelines, Executive Orders by Governor Greg Abbott and the Local Amended Declaration Local Disaster and Public Health Emergency Related to Communicable Disease.

1.            Restrict physical contact and publicly used areas.

2.            Maintain Social Distancing with a safe distance of six (6’) feet between individuals.

3.            Every person in Texas shall avoid social gatherings in groups of 10 or more per Executive Order of Governor Abbott.

4.            Residents should not visit nursing homes, retirement, or long-term care facilities unless to provide critical assistance.

5.            Per the CDC, people shall avoid eating or drinking at bars, restaurants, and food courts, or visiting gyms or massage parlors. Residents may still utilize drive-thru, pickup, or delivery options through the Executive Order.

6.            Regularly wash hands with warm soap and water for at least 20 seconds.

7.            Avoid touching eyes, nose, or mouth.

8.            If soap is not available, use at least a 60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer.

9.            Avoid close contact with people who are sick. All persons should remain in the home if one person in the house exhibits symptoms.

10.          Only one adult should conduct essential errands from the household. Other family members should remain sheltered at home.

11.          CDC recommends wearing a cloth face mask in public. The mask will fit snugly, be secured with ear loops, and be able to be laundered and machine dried often. A mask should not be placed on children under age 2, anyone who has trouble breathing, or unable to remove the mask without assistance. A mask with multiple layers of fabric should allow for breathing without restriction. The cloth face coverings recommended are not surgical masks or N-95 respirators as those critical supplies that must continue to be reserved for healthcare workers and first responders.


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