CORONAVIRUS INFO PROVIDED BY DR. JIM HARRIS – 02/26/2021

J. Harris: The reason to continue to wears masks and keep a distance even if you have been vaccinated is related to the “MUTANTS.” Just like Zombies or charging Rhinos,  they’re hard to kill and might not be covered completely by the vaccination you took. So when you are in a crowded place full of people you’re not sure of, wear a mask. 

WHO HAS COVID VACCINE IN TEXAS?

Texas COVID-19 Vaccine Availability

J. Harris: The Texas Division of Emergency Management has a great map with vaccine locations marked. You can enlarge the map over your area and click on the dots until you find someone with vaccine. Nationally, the swells are putting one of these together according to the NYT, but as of now, they only have 4 states and don’t include Texas. See below:

Here’s my updated list:

LIST OF AREA VACCINATION PROVIDERS LATE FEB, 2021

WHO HAS COVID VACCINE IN TEXAS?

https://tdem.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=3700a84845c5470cb0dc3ddace5c376b

Facilities that offer Covid Vaccinations will light up. Most of them in our area are out of vaccine, but a quick way to check for new vaccine, is to point and click on the various sites to see if vaccine has come in. This is faster than the telephone. I’d get on the waiting list at several area Hubs or sites (mostly drug stores) and continue being careful  with masks and distance. The Vaccine is coming. It should become better and remain steady for the next several months. Help you family and friends get signed up. Help people who may be alone sign up. We’re all in this together and we’ll all get out of it together. Keep up with who you are signing up with so that you can cancel unneeded vaccine appointments so that someone else can fill them.

CHRISTUS GOOD SHEPHERD LONGVIEW HUB

https://vaccinate.christushealth.org/

Check this site daily. They will have more vaccine.

Hopefully Christus-Marshall will have more. 

TYLER HUB (THEY ARE STILL LETTING YOU SIGN UP)

https://www.nethealthcovid19.org/vaccine-updates/

Texas COVID-19 Vaccine Availability—Read this first and follow directions

All area newspapers have information. I don’t know much about social media.

If you have a personal doctor, call his or her office since some private doctors will have access to vaccine or can at least advise you what to do.

SHREVEPORT/LSU SIGN UPS -CHECK KSLA

LSU Health Shreveport announces additional COVID-19 vaccination dates

VACCINATION SITES IN HARRISON COUNTY, TX https://www.signupgenius.com/go/MHCHD to secure their vaccination appointment. ⁠ Orhttps://mhchd.org/ and click on the sign up for a COVID 19 Vaccine link. HARRISON COUNTY TEXAS HEALTH DEPT. 903 938 8338—-use the internet, it’s much faster and easier to sign up   
CHRISTUS GSH MARSHALL903 927 6000
SUPER 1 PHARMACY ON HWY 59903 938 3096
HALLSVILLE BROOKSHIRE PHARMACY903 668 1409
 

LONGVIEW AREA GROCERIES

Brookshire’s on Gilmer Rd

903 297 6963

Super One on Highway 80

903 753 1964

Super One on High St

903 234 2786

Brookshires on HWY 80 in  White Oak

903 297 2785

Louis Morgan #4

903 730 6580

SHREVEPORT LA

See KSLA.org for list

Cited by Hopkins:

1. Covid-19: One in Seven People in England Have Antibodies from Infection or Vaccination, Finds Study (BMJ) Almost 14% of people in England now have evidence of antibodies against SARS-CoV-2, according to the fifth round of the Real-time assessment of community transmission (React-2) study. The study, led by Imperial College London, used the Fortress lateral flow test to detect antibodies in a drop of blood from the finger. Tests were sent to a random sample of the population between 26 January and 8 February 2021 and 154,172 people in England had valid results.This round of the study included—for the first time—18,000 people who had received at least one dose of a coronavirus vaccine.

2. Moderna Ready to Test Version of Covid-19 Vaccine Aimed at Worrisome Variant (STAT News) Moderna is pressing forward with a modified version of its Covid-19 vaccine meant to protect against an emerging strain of the virus, the company said Wednesday, planning to start a clinical trial as soon as regulators give the green light. Moderna said it is seeking to test the novel vaccine on its own and as a combined shot with its current vaccine. It also plans to test whether giving a booster of the current vaccine on its own will give enhanced protection against new variants of the virus that causes Covid-19.

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CORONAVIRUS INFO PROVIDED BY DR. JIM HARRIS – 02/25/2021

CORONAVIRUS INFO PROVIDED BY DR. JIM HARRIS – 02/25/2021

Marshall News Messenger] Marion County to administer second round of vaccinations; Marshall to offer 400 shots this week

(J. Harris: Of course, these were gone almost immediately, most likely.)

Willingness to Pay for a COVID-19 Vaccine

(From Chile)

MORE SCHOOL/COVID CONSIDERATIONS CITED BY HOPKINS:

SCHOOL-BASED TRANSMISSION A study conducted by the University of Florida and the Florida Department of Health, published in JAMA, investigated the impact of student quarantine and testing protocols at K-12 schools in Alachua County, Florida. Data indicate that the COVID-19 incubation period in children is 6 to 7 days, shorter than the 4 to 5 days in adults. The county implemented 14-day self-quarantine for students exposed to known COVID-19 cases, and students were allowed to return to school early if they received a negative RT-PCR diagnostic test on Day 9 or later. The rationale for this program was that SARS-CoV-2 infection should be detectable by Day 9 and that students who tested negative could safely return to school the next day. Out of 799 students who received a negative test under this program, only 1 developed symptomatic disease after returning to school, and genomic data indicate that the student was actually infected through a different exposure than the one that prompted quarantine. The program to enable students to end their quarantine period early reduced the total number of missed school days by more than 30% without resulting in any additional transmission. This study provides evidence that schools can implement testing protocols to promote in-person learning while effectively mitigating transmission risk.

A study conducted by the US CDC COVID-19 Response Team and school and public health officials in Georgia, published in the CDC’s MMWR, found that half of school-associated cases initiated from teacher-to-teacher transmission and then spread from teachers to students. The researchers evaluated data from 24 days of in-person learning at elementary schools in a single school district, which included approximately 2,600 students and 700 staff. In total 9 clusters of cases were identified, involving 13 teachers, 32 students, and 18 additional instances of household transmission. Of the 31 school-associated cases, 15 were students who are believed to have been infected following transmission between teachers. Notably, all 9 of the school clusters “involved less than ideal physical distancing, and five involved inadequate mask use by students.” The “central” role of teachers in school-based transmission provides support for vaccinating teachers in order to mitigate transmission risk during in-person classes. Current US CDC guidance indicates that teachers need not be vaccinated before schools can reopen, but many teachers unions are calling for changes to existing guidance and policies that would prioritize teachers as essential workers in order to provide protection before resuming in-person learning. 

The origin and early spread of SARS-CoV-2 in Europe

“We see that under sustained risk of case migration from abroad, isolated cases were confirmed throughout Europe beginning in late January 2020 but did not immediately cause large outbreaks. Shortly after the first evidence of sustained within-region transmission in Italy, outbreaks in the rest of Europe also took hold.  …we only observe sustained outbreaks in other European regions after the onset of sustained within-region transmission in Italy. Finally, before the first border closures in Europe, we estimate the risk of new cases arising from within-region transmission to be within or exceeding the estimated range for the risk of new migration cases.”

(J. Harris: I think they mean that by the time they closed European borders, Covid was already in their countries and spread there as rapidly as it would have had they left the borders open. Long and complex article.)

CURRENT BECKER CITATIONS:

1.Johnson and Johnson’s single-shot COVID-19 vaccine is safe and prevented both hospitalizations and deaths in a large clinical trial, according to an FDA review. The vaccine was more than 85 percent effective at preventing severe illness and 66 percent effective at preventing moderate and severe disease four weeks after the shot. An external committee is set to meet Feb. 26 to recommend whether the FDA should grant the vaccine emergency authorization, reports The Washington Post.

2. A coronavirus variant found in California in December is more contagious than previously circulating forms of the virus, according to early research cited by The New York Times. The two cited studies have not been peer-reviewed, and researchers said they are unsure how this variant, known as B.1.427/B.1.429, compares to others circulating in the state in terms of their threat to public health.

J. Harris: My Norweigan housekeeper sent me a warning from a “Brand X” magazine  that some recipients of vaccines had later noticed lymph node swelling, presumably under the same arm that received the vaccine. The nodes subsided in a few days. I mention it now so that she continues to keep the table full at meal time. I’m reluctant to “waist away.”

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And it only gets better for Texas

Editor’s note:  This information was provided by one of our readers.

Remember the cost of emergency electricity last week cost more than $50 billion and who do you think is going to pay this — yes, the customers and now we find out we have been paying higher rates along!

(Good news for Harrison County, TX is we are one of the few countries NOT part of this State rip off.)

Wall Street Journal

Texas Electric Bills Were $28 Billion Higher Under Deregulation 

Competition in the electricity-supply business promised reliable power at a more affordable cost

Texas’s deregulated electricity market, which was supposed to provide reliable power at a lower price, left millions in the dark last week. For two decades, its customers have paid more for electricity than state residents who are served by traditional utilities, a Wall Street Journal analysis has found.

Nearly 20 years ago, Texas shifted from using full-service regulated utilities to generate power and deliver it to consumers. The state deregulated power generation, creating the system that failed last week. And it required nearly 60% of consumers to buy their electricity from one of many retail power companies, rather than a local utility.

Those deregulated Texas residential consumers paid $28 billion more for their power since 2004 than they would have paid at the rates charged to the customers of the state’s traditional utilities, according to the Journal’s analysis of data from the federal Energy Information Administration.

The crisis last week was driven by the power producers. Now that power has largely been restored, attention has turned to retail electric companies, a few of which are hitting consumers with steep bills. Power prices surged to the market price cap of $9,000 a megawatt hour for several days during the crisis, a feature of the state’s system designed to incentivize power plants to supply more juice. Some consumers who chose variable rate power plans from retail power companies are seeing the big bills.

None of this was supposed to happen under deregulation. Backers of competition in the electricity-supply business promised it would lower prices for consumers who could shop around for the best deals, just as they do for cellphone service. The system would be an improvement over monopoly utilities, which have little incentive to innovate and provide better service to customers, supporters of deregulation said.

“If all consumers don’t benefit from this, we will have wasted our time and failed our constituency,” then-state Sen. David Sibley, a key author of the bill to deregulate the market, said when the switch was first unveiled in 1999. “Competition in the electric industry will benefit Texans by reducing monthly rates,” then-Gov. George W. Bush said later that year.

The EIA data shows how much electricity each utility or retail provider sold to residents in a given year and how much customers paid for it. The Journal calculated separate annual statewide rates for utilities and retailers by adding up all of the revenue each type of provider received and dividing it by the kilowatt-hours of electricity it sold.

From 2004 through 2019, the annual rate for electricity from Texas’s traditional utilities was 8% lower, on average, than the nationwide average rate, while the rates of retail providers averaged 13% higher than the nationwide rate, according to the Journal’s analysis.

The Texas Coalition for Affordable Power, a group that buys electricity for local government use, produced similar findings in a study of the state’s power markets and concluded that high statewide prices relative to the national average “must be attributed to the deregulated sector of Texas.”

In other states that allow retail competition for electricity, customers have the option of getting their power from a regulated utility. The absence of an incumbent utility in parts of Texas that allow retail competition makes it difficult for consumers to know if they are paying too much for power, critics say.

The push to deregulate the electricity-supply market in Texas and elsewhere in the U.S. began in the 1990s amid similar efforts in airlines, natural gas and phone services. Leading the charge was Enron, the Houston energy company and champion of free markets that went bankrupt in 2001 amid revelations of widespread fraud.

For power generators, the laissez-faire market design rewarded companies that could sell electricity inexpensively and still recover their capital costs. But it provided little incentive for companies to spend cash on infrastructure that could protect power plants during sporadic severe cold snaps.

Catherine Webking, general counsel for the Texas Energy Association for Marketers, an industry trade group, said retail providers give customers access to more choices than many standard utilities, such as renewable-energy products. Customers also typically have the option to switch plans, she said. If customers “don’t feel it’s the best thing for them they can find a different provider,” she said. 

On the retail power side, dozens of competitors emerged after deregulation. But recently, competition in Texas has been declining amid a wave or mergers in the industry.

Texas is home to the two of the nation’s largest retail-energy providers, VistraCorp. VST +2.07% and NRG Energy Inc. NRG +0.52%Marketers now owned by the two companies accounted for three quarters of the retail electricity sold in Texas in 2019.

In January, NRG completed its $3.6 billion purchase of retail-energy provider Direct Energy, which doubled the number of NRG’s retail customers to six million and boosted its workforce from about 4,500 to 7,500. About half of its retail customers are in Texas.

Vistra’s largest Texas retail subsidiary, TXU Energy, and NRG have said their customers wouldn’t be hit by spiking prices due to the blackouts because their electricity plans aren’t tied to short-term price swings in the wholesale electricity market.

Tim Morstad, associate state director of AARP Texas and a critic of retail-energy suppliers, said he expects many retail customers to suffer increases in their rates in the near future as the companies price in sky-high power rates seen during the winter blast. Most vulnerable, he said, would be customers of retail energy providers who have signed up for variable-rate plans that rise and fall every month amid fluctuations in market rates.

“The prices are definitely going to increase,” he said. “For those on variable contracts, they’ll feel the pinch sooner.”

Some retail-energy providers enter long-term contracts for the electricity they sell to consumers, potentially shielding them from the dramatic surge in the wholesale market seen last week, said Kenneth Rose, an independent consultant at Michigan State University who has studied the retail-energy industry.

The Texas Public Utility Commission said it has “strongly urged” retail electric providers to delay billing residential and small commercial customers.

Remember the cost of emergency electricity last week cost more than $50 billion and who do you think is going to pay this — yes, the customers and now we find out we have been paying higher rates along!

(Good news for Harrison County, TX is we are one of the few counties NOT part of this State rip off.)

Wall Street Jounal

Texas Electric Bills Were $28 Billion Higher Under Deregulation 

Competition in the electricity-supply business promised reliable power at a more affordable cost

Texas’s deregulated electricity market, which was supposed to provide reliable power at a lower price, left millions in the dark last week. For two decades, its customers have paid more for electricity than state residents who are served by traditional utilities, a Wall Street Journal analysis has found.

Nearly 20 years ago, Texas shifted from using full-service regulated utilities to generate power and deliver it to consumers. The state deregulated power generation, creating the system that failed last week. And it required nearly 60% of consumers to buy their electricity from one of many retail power companies, rather than a local utility.

Those deregulated Texas residential consumers paid $28 billion more for their power since 2004 than they would have paid at the rates charged to the customers of the state’s traditional utilities, according to the Journal’s analysis of data from the federal Energy Information Administration.

The crisis last week was driven by the power producers. Now that power has largely been restored, attention has turned to retail electric companies, a few of which are hitting consumers with steep bills. Power prices surged to the market price cap of $9,000 a megawatt hourfor several days during the crisis, a feature of the state’s system designed to incentivize power plants to supply more juice. Some consumers who chose variable rate power plans from retail power companies are seeing the big bills.

None of this was supposed to happen under deregulation. Backers of competition in the electricity-supply business promised it would lower prices for consumers who could shop around for the best deals, just as they do for cellphone service. The system would be an improvement over monopoly utilities, which have little incentive to innovate and provide better service to customers, supporters of deregulation said.

“If all consumers don’t benefit from this, we will have wasted our time and failed our constituency,” then-state Sen. David Sibley, a key author of the bill to deregulate the market, said when the switch was first unveiled in 1999. “Competition in the electric industry will benefit Texans by reducing monthly rates,” then-Gov. George W. Bush said later that year.

The EIA data shows how much electricity each utility or retail provider sold to residents in a given year and how much customers paid for it. The Journal calculated separate annual statewide rates for utilities and retailers by adding up all of the revenue each type of provider received and dividing it by the kilowatt-hours of electricity it sold.

From 2004 through 2019, the annual rate for electricity from Texas’s traditional utilities was 8% lower, on average, than the nationwide average rate, while the rates of retail providers averaged 13% higher than the nationwide rate, according to the Journal’s analysis.

The Texas Coalition for Affordable Power, a group that buys electricity for local government use, produced similar findings in a study of the state’s power markets and concluded that high statewide prices relative to the national average “must be attributed to the deregulated sector of Texas.”

In other states that allow retail competition for electricity, customers have the option of getting their power from a regulated utility. The absence of an incumbent utility in parts of Texas that allow retail competition makes it difficult for consumers to know if they are paying too much for power, critics say.

The push to deregulate the electricity-supply market in Texas and elsewhere in the U.S. began in the 1990s amid similar efforts in airlines, natural gas and phone services. Leading the charge was Enron, the Houston energy company and champion of free markets that went bankrupt in 2001 amid revelations of widespread fraud.

For power generators, the laissez-faire market design rewarded companies that could sell electricity inexpensively and still recover their capital costs. But it provided little incentive for companies to spend cash on infrastructure that could protect power plants during sporadic severe cold snaps.

Catherine Webking, general counsel for the Texas Energy Association for Marketers, an industry trade group, said retail providers give customers access to more choices than many standard utilities, such as renewable-energy products. Customers also typically have the option to switch plans, she said. If customers “don’t feel it’s the best thing for them they can find a different provider,” she said. 

On the retail power side, dozens of competitors emerged after deregulation. But recently, competition in Texas has been declining amid a wave or mergers in the industry.

Texas is home to the two of the nation’s largest retail-energy providers, VistraCorp. VST +2.07% and NRG Energy Inc. NRG +0.52%Marketers now owned by the two companies accounted for three quarters of the retail electricity sold in Texas in 2019.

In January, NRG completed its $3.6 billion purchase of retail-energy provider Direct Energy, which doubled the number of NRG’s retail customers to six million and boosted its workforce from about 4,500 to 7,500. About half of its retail customers are in Texas.

Vistra’s largest Texas retail subsidiary, TXU Energy, and NRG have said their customers wouldn’t be hit by spiking prices due to the blackouts because their electricity plans aren’t tied to short-term price swings in the wholesale electricity market.

Tim Morstad, associate state director of AARP Texas and a critic of retail-energy suppliers, said he expects many retail customers to suffer increases in their rates in the near future as the companies price in sky-high power rates seen during the winter blast. Most vulnerable, he said, would be customers of retail energy providers who have signed up for variable-rate plans that rise and fall every month amid fluctuations in market rates.

“The prices are definitely going to increase,” he said. “For those on variable contracts, they’ll feel the pinch sooner.”

Some retail-energy providers enter long-term contracts for the electricity they sell to consumers, potentially shielding them from the dramatic surge in the wholesale market seen last week, said Kenneth Rose, an independent consultant at Michigan State University who has studied the retail-energy industry.

The Texas Public Utility Commission said it has “strongly urged” retail electric providers to delay billing residential and small commercial customers.

Remember the cost of emergency electricity last week cost more than $50 billion and who do you think is going to pay this — yes, the customers and now we find out we have been paying higher rates along!

(Good news for Harrison County, TX is we are one of the few countries NOT part of this State rip off.)

Wall Street Jounal

Texas Electric Bills Were $28 Billion Higher Under Deregulation 

Competition in the electricity-supply business promised reliable power at a more affordable cost

Texas’s deregulated electricity market, which was supposed to provide reliable power at a lower price, left millions in the dark last week. For two decades, its customers have paid more for electricity than state residents who are served by traditional utilities, a Wall Street Journal analysis has found.

Nearly 20 years ago, Texas shifted from using full-service regulated utilities to generate power and deliver it to consumers. The state deregulated power generation, creating the system that failed last week. And it required nearly 60% of consumers to buy their electricity from one of many retail power companies, rather than a local utility.

Those deregulated Texas residential consumers paid $28 billion more for their power since 2004 than they would have paid at the rates charged to the customers of the state’s traditional utilities, according to the Journal’s analysis of data from the federal Energy Information Administration.

The crisis last week was driven by the power producers. Now that power has largely been restored, attention has turned to retail electric companies, a few of which are hitting consumers with steep bills. Power prices surged to the market price cap of $9,000 a megawatt hourfor several days during the crisis, a feature of the state’s system designed to incentivize power plants to supply more juice. Some consumers who chose variable rate power plans from retail power companies are seeing the big bills.

None of this was supposed to happen under deregulation. Backers of competition in the electricity-supply business promised it would lower prices for consumers who could shop around for the best deals, just as they do for cellphone service. The system would be an improvement over monopoly utilities, which have little incentive to innovate and provide better service to customers, supporters of deregulation said.

“If all consumers don’t benefit from this, we will have wasted our time and failed our constituency,” then-state Sen. David Sibley, a key author of the bill to deregulate the market, said when the switch was first unveiled in 1999. “Competition in the electric industry will benefit Texans by reducing monthly rates,” then-Gov. George W. Bush said later that year.

The EIA data shows how much electricity each utility or retail provider sold to residents in a given year and how much customers paid for it. The Journal calculated separate annual statewide rates for utilities and retailers by adding up all of the revenue each type of provider received and dividing it by the kilowatt-hours of electricity it sold.

From 2004 through 2019, the annual rate for electricity from Texas’s traditional utilities was 8% lower, on average, than the nationwide average rate, while the rates of retail providers averaged 13% higher than the nationwide rate, according to the Journal’s analysis.

The Texas Coalition for Affordable Power, a group that buys electricity for local government use, produced similar findings in a study of the state’s power markets and concluded that high statewide prices relative to the national average “must be attributed to the deregulated sector of Texas.”

In other states that allow retail competition for electricity, customers have the option of getting their power from a regulated utility. The absence of an incumbent utility in parts of Texas that allow retail competition makes it difficult for consumers to know if they are paying too much for power, critics say.

The push to deregulate the electricity-supply market in Texas and elsewhere in the U.S. began in the 1990s amid similar efforts in airlines, natural gas and phone services. Leading the charge was Enron, the Houston energy company and champion of free markets that went bankrupt in 2001 amid revelations of widespread fraud.

For power generators, the laissez-faire market design rewarded companies that could sell electricity inexpensively and still recover their capital costs. But it provided little incentive for companies to spend cash on infrastructure that could protect power plants during sporadic severe cold snaps.

Catherine Webking, general counsel for the Texas Energy Association for Marketers, an industry trade group, said retail providers give customers access to more choices than many standard utilities, such as renewable-energy products. Customers also typically have the option to switch plans, she said. If customers “don’t feel it’s the best thing for them they can find a different provider,” she said. 

On the retail power side, dozens of competitors emerged after deregulation. But recently, competition in Texas has been declining amid a wave or mergers in the industry.

Texas is home to the two of the nation’s largest retail-energy providers, VistraCorp. VST +2.07% and NRG Energy Inc. NRG +0.52%Marketers now owned by the two companies accounted for three quarters of the retail electricity sold in Texas in 2019.

In January, NRG completed its $3.6 billion purchase of retail-energy provider Direct Energy, which doubled the number of NRG’s retail customers to six million and boosted its workforce from about 4,500 to 7,500. About half of its retail customers are in Texas.

Vistra’s largest Texas retail subsidiary, TXU Energy, and NRG have said their customers wouldn’t be hit by spiking prices due to the blackouts because their electricity plans aren’t tied to short-term price swings in the wholesale electricity market.

Tim Morstad, associate state director of AARP Texas and a critic of retail-energy suppliers, said he expects many retail customers to suffer increases in their rates in the near future as the companies price in sky-high power rates seen during the winter blast. Most vulnerable, he said, would be customers of retail energy providers who have signed up for variable-rate plans that rise and fall every month amid fluctuations in market rates.

“The prices are definitely going to increase,” he said. “For those on variable contracts, they’ll feel the pinch sooner.”

Some retail-energy providers enter long-term contracts for the electricity they sell to consumers, potentially shielding them from the dramatic surge in the wholesale market seen last week, said Kenneth Rose, an independent consultant at Michigan State University who has studied the retail-energy industry.

The Texas Public Utility Commission said it has “strongly urged” retail electric providers to delay billing residential and small commercial customers.

***********************************

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CORONAVIRUS INFO PROVIDED BY DR. JIM HARRIS – 02/24/2021

What are our local and county wide plans to help people get vaccinated? Who has the plan? When does it start. Only 2.2% of county people are vaccinated. The state average is 4.9% vaccinated. (Gregg 4.1%, Smith 6.0%).The vaccines are safe and work very well. The few people who sick despite having been vaccinated are rarely sick enough to require hospitalization! We are making progress, but locally, we are falling behind the rest of the area counties and the state. Encouragine and implementing vaccinations is now a LOCAL PROBLEM. Let’s get rolling. 

Good News from the CDC, cited by Hopkins:

“The US CDC reported 27.94 million total cases and 497,415 deaths. Daily incidence continues to fall sharply in the US, now down to fewer than 65,000 new cases per day—the lowest average since October 23, 2020…As daily COVID-19 incidence and mortality continue to decrease in the US, so do hospitalizations. According to data compiled by the COVID Tracking Project, current hospitalizations nationwide are down to 55,403, a decrease of 58% from the peak on January 6…The official CDC data track the number of new hospitalizations per day (ie, as opposed to current hospitalizations). New hospitalizations peaked on January 6, with an average of 16,536 per day. Since then, new daily hospitalizations have declined steadily, down to 6,417—a decrease of more than 60% from the peak. The current average is more than 20% less than the previous week.”

Experimental infection of domestic dogs and cats with SARS-CoV-2: Pathogenesis, transmission, and response to reexposure in cats

“…This manuscript describes a pilot study in which domestic cats and dogs were assessed for their susceptibility to infection. While neither species developed clinical disease in this study, cats shed infectious virus for up to 5 d and infected naive cats via direct contact, while dogs do not appear to shed virus. Cats that were reinfected with SARS-CoV-2 mounted an effective immune response and did not become reinfected. These studies have important implications for animal health and suggest that cats may be a good model for vaccine development.”

(J. Harris: Other studies mentioned in this article show dogs can also become infected and shed viruses.)

Cited by Becker’s:

1. Americans may still need to wear face masks in 2022, Anthony Fauci, MD, said during a Feb. 21 interview on CNN’s State of the Union. The director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases said the U.S. may reach “a significant degree of normality” by the end of 2021, but did not rule out the possibility of masks being needed next year.

2. The FDA issued an alert about the accuracy of pulse oximeters Feb. 19. The agency said pulse oximeter readings can be affected by multiple factors, including skin pigmentation, skin thickness, poor circulation, skin temperature, tobacco use and fingernail polish. 

HOPKINS SUGGESTS:

Smiths Detection’s BioFlesh system capable of detecting SARS-CoV-2 in the air

Prospective mapping of viral mutations that escape antibodies used to treat COVID-19 (J. Harris: Unfortunately some of the mutants are already circulating.)

VISUALIZING CASKETS FROM NEW YORK TO INDIANAPOLIS

By Debra Adams Simmons, HISTORY Executive Editor, (NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC)

“How do you process a number as staggering as 500,000 COVID-19 deaths in the United States…The number is 25 percent more than the U.S. military death toll in World War II. It would be like imagining every person in a city the size of Atlanta had been lost. Or every postal service worker. This unimaginable number, 500,000, translates into 645 miles of caskets spread end to end…”

A Vaccination against the Pandemic of Misinformation

“Has our nation’s suboptimal education weakened the prefrontal cortex of our American brain, thus leaving us susceptible to false beliefs? Low educational attainment is a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia, suggesting that high educational attainment is associated with fostering neuroanatomical conditions that protect our brain from the pathophysiologic changes of Alzheimer’s disease. This remarkable scientific finding supports the idea that high-quality education and science literacy physiologically and functionally strengthen the brain, protecting us from the threat of false beliefs during times of uncertainty and crisis.”

(J. Harris: This is a provocative Scientific American article of interest to educational advocates as well as to those who just can’t believe the number of modern Americans whose thoughtlessness, unmasked by the pandemic, might provoke Shakespear’s lament: “Lord what fools these mortals be…”)

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CORONAVIRUS INFO PROVIDED BY DR. JIM HARRIS – 02/23/2021

HELLO,

I am unaware of any current Vaccination Data. Should any current Harrison County vaccination information come your way, please pass it on. J. Harris

SARS-CoV-2 antibody seroprevalence in the general population and high-risk occupational groups across 18 cities in Iran: a population-based cross-sectional study

” In conclusion, the findings of this study imply that prevalence of seropositivity is likely to be much higher than the reported prevalence rates based on confirmed COVID-19 cases in Iran. Despite the high seroprevalence estimates in a few cities, the low overall prevalence estimates highlight the fact that a large proportion of the population in Iran is still uninfected. The similar seroprevalence estimates across high-risk occupations in this study could indicate that the currently applied infection control measures might be inadequate or not appropriately adhered to or enforced. As such, there is an urgent need for public health policies and adequate personal protective equipment among front-line workers to prevent the potential increase in patient load in hospitals across the country, especially during the second wave of infection.”

(J. Harris: Many don’t agree with all of the statistics in this study; however, it seems to present a good overall picture of Covid in Iran?)

ANOTHER LANCET  ARTICLE:

Anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in healthy donor plasma pools and IVIG products

“These results suggest that plasma pools for fractionation might mirror the immunogenic status of the general population regarding SARS-CoV-2. Consequently, anti SARS-CoV-2 antibodies are being increasingly integrated into therapeutic IVIG products and, presumably, into intramuscular and subcutaneous immunoglobulin products. Since these products are indicated for immunodeficient patients and other therapeutic or prophylactic approaches, a close follow-up of the progression of the presence of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in both plasma pools and IgG products is recommended.”

(J. Harris: Treatment with serum products containing antibodies to Covid has been shown to be of therapeutic benefit, and by studying blood donors, the percentage of prior Covid infected individuals in selected populations can be closely estimated from various areas and Countries.)

Booster Shots Against Scary COVID Virus Variants Are In the Works

(J. Harris: Nice readable article on good vaccine progress toward updated formulations and boosters and discusses all the available vaccines, briefly.)

Association of the Timing of School Closings and Behavioral Changes With the Evolution of the Coronavirus Disease 2019 Pandemic in the US

“Given the uncertainty surrounding the severity and transmission dynamics of the disease, the decision to close schools in spring 2020 was reasonable. However, this analysis suggests that school closures did not play the only or even most important role in slowing the spread of the disease. Other, less harmful, means may be found in the future to effectively limit further spread of COVID-19.”

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CORONAVIRUS INFO PROVIDED BY DR. JIM HARRIS – 02/22/2021

J. Harris: The numbers are still lagging due to the weather related reporting difficulties.

Nevertheless, most Covid news is GOOD. I plan to help promote vaccinations over the next few months, and continued preventive measures, such as MASKS. Harrison County has many people who don’t or won’t wear masks. Recent visitors from Austin were incredulous that  many people were not wearing masks when out and about downtown. Stores did not check temperatures or insist that customers be masked in order to shop in their stores. Naturally, cautious people avoid shopping in Marshall if they can. We must remain vigilant and carefully evaluate the illness that the “Mutants” might cause now and in the future. It will be difficult to reach “herd immunity” when only 2.2% of Harrison County citizens have been vaccinated? 

The Pandemic Is Receding in the Worst Hotspots. Will It Last?

(J. Harris: Good NYT general article with brief world wide review of diminished Covid cases and why.)

Early High-Titer Plasma Therapy to Prevent Severe Covid-19 in Older Adults

(J. Harris: We saw a brief summary of this a couple of days ago. We also have a chart which is a new way to present data to the public with a medical article.)

“RESULTS

A total of 160 patients underwent randomization. In the intention-to-treat population, severe respiratory disease developed in 13 of 80 patients (16%) who received convalescent plasma and 25 of 80 patients (31%) who received placebo (relative risk, 0.52; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.29 to 0.94; P=0.03), with a relative risk reduction of 48%. A modified intention-to-treat analysis that excluded 6 patients who had a primary end-point event before infusion of convalescent plasma or placebo showed a larger effect size (relative risk, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.20 to 0.81). No solicited adverse events were observed.

CONCLUSIONS

Early administration of high-titer convalescent plasma against SARS-CoV-2 to mildly ill infected older adults reduced the progression of Covid-19….”

Repurposed Antiviral Drugs for Covid-19 — Interim WHO Solidarity Trial Results

“CONCLUSIONS

These remdesivir, hydroxychloroquine, lopinavir, and interferon regimens had little or no effect on hospitalized patients with Covid-19, as indicated by overall mortality, initiation of ventilation, and duration of hospital stay.

“Here Is What Happened To Me Six Months After Recovering From COVID-19

(J. Harris: Sequlae to a mild case of Covid in an understandably confused patient.)

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I-just-don’t-get-it headline of the day

I-just-don’t-get-it headline of the day:

“Nearly 180 Democrats support forming $12 million, 13-member slavery reparations commission”

I don’t care about the number of members in any federal commission. Many commissions are turned to boost egos and memorable change from the efforts is elusive, at best. The point of even discussing cash slavery reparation payments is box-of-hair dumb.

The fact there ever was slavery in this country is appalling. Period. Paragraph.

“We, the people…all men are created equal….” should say it all today, even though when the document was written, those words were understood to mean “We, the people (white men only)….”

Paying money to people whose great great grandfathers and great-great grandmothers were slaves does not undue the generations of abuse blacks suffered at the hands of white owners. A check from the government is a here-and-gone gesture made in an attempt to say, “Sorry that some of our ancestors used some of your ancestors as livestock. Here. Here’s some money snd let’s just let bygones be bygones.”

No. That’s not the answer. Some ills cannot be cured with money; some events in history are carved into history like a brand; some wrongs are lodged in the souls and psyches of the human spirit.

We don’t need a feel-good reparations commission; we need a different commission, a group of forward thinkers that have the wherewithal, the clout and the blessing of the federal government to create a pathway — a true roadmap — of equality for every citizen and m, yes, prospective citizen.

Equality. That should be the goal, equal treatment under the law, protected once and for all by the power of federal government. True, there are laws already on the books demanding equality for all citizens that are being blatantly ignored. While the commission is doing it work, every law needs to be reviewed as compliance should be enforced.

Equality is the goal, for minorities, for women, for all citizens regardless of skin tone, sexual orientation, religious preference, nation of origin, individual beliefs.

Total equality is an impossible goal; it is impossible to legislate thoughts, beliefs, visceral human emotions.  But that should not deter the effort to further strengthen the foundation of equality via reviewing and renewing the 1964 Civil Rights Act to reflect today’s realities.

No citizen — NO CITIZEN — in society, school, business or under the laws of this nation, should be judged by any measurement other than, to quote Martin Kurher King Jr., “…the content of their character.”

Regardless of law, regardless of educational efforts, there will always be bigots. Like the poor, every nation has its share of ignorant, prejudiced people who ostracize others they deem “not worthy” by standards foisted upon them from the cradle or learned through indoctrination and cult-speak.

You cannot legislate morality and ethical behavior, but you can legislate public behavior, set enforceable business standards against prejudicial treatment and educate the populous in the value of a diverse society.

Now, right now, is the time to reevaluate the existing laws and  ensure they are sufficient to move the nation into the next era of seeking improved equality … the united people of the United States.

Equality: An impossible concept to achieve, but a goal this nation is duty-bound to pursue.

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CORONAVIRUS INFO PROVIDED BY DR. JIM HARRIS – 02/20/2021

GOOD VACCINE NEWS FROM NYT FRI:

A batch of new data this week is giving us more insight into the effectiveness of vaccines and how to best distribute them. Let’s start with a few positive developments that could expand access to the Pfizer-BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine.
A new study in Israel found that the Pfizer vaccine was 85 percent effective after one shot, a finding that could lead some countries to delay the second shot in order to get more people vaccinated more quickly.The results echo research on the AstraZeneca vaccine, which has been shown to offer protection weeks after the first dose.A separate study published today suggested that the AstraZeneca vaccine was more effective when people received a second dose after three months, instead of six weeks.
The new findings lend ammunition to experts and governments, including that of Britain, which have advocated a “first dose first” strategy, which prioritizes giving as many people as possible an initial dose. But Dr. Fauci said that U.S. health officials were not willing to change their recommendations that all people receive two shots.
Pfizer and BioNTech also announced today that their vaccine can be stored at standard freezer temperatures for up to two weeks, rather than five days as recommended in their initial guidelines. Distribution of doses has been complicated by the requirement that the vaccines be stored at ultracold temperatures, and the change has the potential to expand the number of smaller pharmacies and doctors’ offices that can administer the vaccine.
Separately, new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that the vaccines from Pfizer and BioNTech and Moderna were reassuringly safe and that side effects were rare. The agency examined nearly 14 million vaccinations and found nearly 7,000 reports of adverse events — including headaches, fatigue and muscle aches — and said that 91 percent of those cases were not serious.From Hopkins: Additional resources are available on our website.1. EMERGING VARIANTS A study published (preprint) by Harvard University examines the nasopharyngeal viral concentration in individuals infected with the B.1.1.7 SARS-CoV-2 variant…  The researchers found that infection with the B.1.1.7 variant lasted significantly longer than for other variants, with a mean duration of infection of 13.3 days for the B.1.1.7 variant, compared to 8.2 days for non-B.1.1.7 variants. While the duration of infection was longer for the B.1.1.7 variant, the peak viral concentration was similar between B.1.1.7 and non-B.1.1.7 variants.”SARS-CoV-2 Positivity on or After 9 Days Among Quarantined Student Contacts of Confirmed Cases  (In this study of a 9-day testing protocol for student contacts of confirmed COVID-19 cases in 1 Florida county, a reduction in loss of instructional time was found that was less than what would have occurred with 14-day quarantine. There was no evidence that an earlier return to school with a negative test result was linked with subsequent symptomatic illness. Had students returned to school before day 14 without testing on day 9 or thereafter, 8.2% of high school contacts would have returned to school with SARS-CoV-2 infection. These findings should be considered when evaluating the December 2020 CDC recommendation for a 10-day quarantine without testing or a 7-day quarantine with testing.Sequelae in Adults at 6 Months After COVID-19 Infection “In this cohort of individuals with COVID-19 who were followed up for as long as 9 months after illness, approximately 30% reported persistent symptoms. A unique aspect of our cohort is the high proportion of outpatients with mild disease…”(J. Harris: LONG HAULER ARTICLE, which includes many patients whose illness did not require hospitalization. A significant number of people were significantly improved by 9 months

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CORONAVIRUS INFO PROVIDED BY DR. JIM HARRIS – 02/19/2021

COVID-19 Cases Are Dropping Fast. Why?

“Four reasons: social distancing, seasonality, seroprevalence, and shots.”

(J. Harris: This is a readable, informative article. I’d add another reason cases are dropping: No one’s testing for Covid in many areas, including Texas.)

Experts Express Concern Over Airborne Spread of More Contagious Coronavirus

(J. Harris: Easy to read article makes you want to double mask with the mutants lurking about.)

Childhood Colds Do Not Prevent Coronavirus Infection, Study Finds

“The idea that having the snuffles a while back somehow protects you from SARS-CoV-2 infection has always left me cold, but it’s been a persistent urban legend throughout the pandemic,…Hopefully, this new paper will finally cool everyone down and put such thoughts into the freezer.”

(J. Harris: Good NYT summary of several articles. Having had lots of “colds” does not protect kids or adults from Covid infection. Several articles are reviewed.)

HOW LONG DOES IT TAKE MY VACCINE TO WORK:

HOPKINS SUGGESTIONS:

1. U.K. Gets Approval to Infect Healthy Volunteers in World’s First Coronavirus ‘Challenge Trial’ (Washington Post) Britain will become the first country to deliberately infect healthy volunteers with the coronavirus, now that the country’s ethics body has approved a “human challenge trial.”

The effort, funded by the British government, aims to accelerate scientific understanding of vaccines and treatments.

2. Scientists Call on C.D.C. to Set Air Standards for Workplaces, Now (New York Times) Nearly a year after scientists showed that the coronavirus can be inhaled in tiny droplets called aerosols that linger indoors in stagnant air, more than a dozen experts are calling on the Biden administration to take immediate action to limit airborne transmission of the virus in high-risk settings like meatpacking plants and prisons.

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I Have A Dream

By Ron Munden – 2/18/2021

2021 has proved one thing – Texas is unprepared for cold weather.  I am one of the lucky ones. I have power currently.  I do not have the internet, so I have lots of time to write about the past.

I don’t dream often.  At least I do not remember my dreams very much.  When I do dream it is often the same dream.

In the dream – I am always carrying a football going for a touchdown.  I take a hit and go down just inches short of the goal line.  The outcome of the dream never changes.

My football career started on a Saturday afternoon in June 1954.  That was the day for Little League tryouts in Marshall Texas.  I have been practicing baseball with my friend Charles McIntire for weeks prior to this day.  At noon Charles’ dad drove us to sign-up for the tryouts.  He dropped us off and drove home.  All was going well until I found out that it cost $2 to register.  I had no money.  I panicked, put my baseball glove under my arm and ran home from the Little League park to 902 East Burleson.

By the time I arrived home my dad had come home from work.  He ask me why I was home.  I explained.  He seemed concerned but not mad at me.  He just said, “Get in the car.”

I assumed he was driving me back to the Little League park, but I was wrong.  Instead, he drove to Logan and Whaley Sporting Goods Store and bought a football.  The rest of the afternoon he and I passed the football in the backyard.

During one of our breaks my dad told me what my future was going to look like.  He said that he did not have the money to send me to college, but I was going to college on a football scholarship and I was going to be an engineer.  He then said that if I did not do this, I was going you spend the rest of my life working in the body shop.  Since I have been working summers in the body shop since I was 9-years old, I knew exactly what that meant, and I also knew I did not want that life.

While it might be blind luck, what dad told me happened just like he said.  However we lived in a railroad town, I had never met an engineer and I really did not know what an engineer was, I spent the next couple of years thinking I was going to spend my life driving trains.

My father telling me that I was going to play football came as a surprise.  I had never thought about playing football but that fall my dad took me to sign up for midget football.

My first year of football could not be rated as a big success.  Football is a contact sport and I hated hitting and being hit. I have always been blessed with speed, but I used that speed to run away from action, not toward it.  So that first year I played bench warmer.  I hated playing football but I hated thought of telling my father I was quitting much more.

I continued holding the well-deserved position of bench warmer through the 7th and 8th grade.  But something happened in the 8th grade.  I changed from hating contact and hitting to loving it. The high point of my 8th grade year was overhearing a 9th grade player let his friend I really hit hard.

I was an undiagnosed dyslectic throughout grade school thru graduate school.  I only found out later in life.  Now I understand why school was so difficult for me during my early years.

Though grade school and the first two years of junior high I hated school.  I dreaded going to school every day.  I was at the bottom of my class and my twin sister Carol was at the top.

Finally, in the 9th grade I found something I was good at – algebra. I had always understood all of the concepts and processes of arithmetic, but I often got the answer wrong because of transposing numbers.  In algebra it is hard to transpose an “x” or “y”. 

In football, after three years of bench warming, I made the starting lineup.

My high school football years were good but not great.  I played a lot and I did make all-district my senior year. I got to play because I was fast not because I was big.  I ended my high school senior at 6 foot 1 inch and 142 pounds. 

I never thought about where I would go to college.  I knew the school would choose me by offering me a scholarship or I would not go to college.  I quickly found that very few schools wanted to offer a football scholarship to a 142-pound halfback.  Because of my speed I did get track scholarship offers from some major schools but at that time track scholarships were only half-scholarships and that was not an option.  I also knew my father wanted me to play football.

That left the junior colleges, Kilgore and Tyler JCs were talking to me.

Fortunately, Bob Mason, a Marshall coach, took me under his wing.  No one in my family had been to college so I knew nothing about college and even how to apply.

Coach Mason was coaching at Marshall but had announced that he was leaving to take a coaching position at Austin College in Sherman.  He asks me if I would like to see Austin College.  Of course, I said yes.  He and his wife took me to AC for a weekend.  At the end of the weekend, he asked me if I would like to go to school there.  The rest is history.  He helped me complete all the paperwork and I was off to Austin College in the fall of 1961.

I arrive at Austin College in August to start two-a-day workouts.  I was probably in the best shape of my life.  I spent most of the summer building fence but quit two weeks before leaving for college.  I sent 8 to 10 hours each day working out at the old Mav stratum with other guys that were also headed off to college.

I was up to 152 pounds when I arrived at AC.  Even though I was small, I was the fastest player on the team and that earned me a starting position as defensive safety my freshman year.

Being a college athlete was a completely new experience for me.  I got to eat on the training table.  I got all the food I could eat and things that I had not eaten before. I don’t recall eating a baked potato before getting to AC but I had one every night after that first night. Between classes I would go to the gym and get high-cal chocolate drinks, I returned home to Marshall at Christmas weighing 195 pounds.  I was longer one of the small guys.

Coach Mason once told my father that he thought the more I played the better I played.  In track he registered me for the maximum number of events allowed in a track meet.  He must have passed that on to the head football coach, Coach Gass.

My sophomore year at AC, I continued to play defensive safety but also played running back on the offensive about half of the time.  I loved being on the field that much.  I reached 200 pounds that year which made me a more effective ball carrier.  Unfortunately, my ability to receive a pass did not improve.

My junior year at AC was my dream year.  It started with a bang – a bang I was not expecting.  Coach Gass always called the plays from the sideline and a player took the play to the huddle. The first game of the year, AC received the kickoff, and then I carried the ball the first 5 or 6 plays in a row, including a 45-yard run that was called back for clipping.  After the last play in the series, I was laying on the ground in the end zone and thinking “do I have enough energy left to walk off the field.”

After being on the sideline for a series or two, I was back in the game, but I never carried the ball two plays in a row for the rest of the game.  At half-time I remember sitting against the wall in the locker room sipping on coke from a cup.  The coach was discussing the game plan for the second half.  At one point he looked at me and said, “Horse can you keep running?”  When though I was so tired it felt like my arms were asleep, I said, “yes sir.”  I must not be very convincing.  I only got to carry the ball a few times the second half but still went over 100-yard rushing for the game.

Things continued going well for the season and I racked up more 100-yard plus games.  The last game of the season I did pull a groin muscle, but I just slowed me down for that one game.  All-in-all it was a good season.  I was lucky enough to be named to the Dallas Morning News All-Texas Football Team and even started getting letters from some of the pro team.  At this point I only remember the San Francisco 49s and the Pittsburgh Steelers.

Even though I had increased my weight to about 210, I had a successful track season recording a series of 9.7-hundred-yard dashes.

I was honored to be selected as the athlete of the year at Austin College.

It was a very good year.

Austin College is a well-respected liberal arts school, but I went there because I could get my education paid for not because I want a liberal art degree.  Remember, I was going to be an engineer.  My plans called for me to transfer to University of Texas, Austin at the end of the year three to work on my engineering degree.  I considered my athletic career over.

In the late spring of that year, I was contacted by the Head Football Coach and he suggested I consider coming back to AC for one more semester.  He outlined some of the benefits.  Almost immediately after that my father called and said he had been talking to the Coach.  He said that he really wanted me to go back to AC for a semester and if I decided to go back, he could afford to buy me a new car.  At this point all of my cars had been cars that had been totaled in a wrench and repaired by us at the body shop.

So just like that my plans changed, and I was going back to AC for a semester and I would be driving a new car.

Maybe if I had been honest with people, they would not have pushed me to come back to AC.  I never told my coaches or my father that my groin injury had not fully gone away.  I could sprint because you don’t use the groin muscle but when I moved to the side, I could still feel it.  I just thought if I gave it enough time it would heal.

The 1st of July was when I started training for football each year.  1964 was no different but the day after my first workout was quite different.  After running several sets of sharp cuts, it was clear that the groin injury was still there.  I knew I had a problem.  I called the coaches at AC.  They said to come up to Sherman immediately and they would send me to an athletic doctor.

After the doctor did his exam and a series of x-rays, he said that part of the groin muscle had pulled loose from the bone taking a piece of bone with it. He said it could be repaired with surgery, but I would not be ready by the start of the football season.  Surgery was out. So, they started treatment with shots and physical theory.

My senior season was not a good season.  I played every game, but my numbers did not match by junior year.  I could run but not without pain.  My senior year the routine became to play the game on Saturday and run like nothing was wrong.  By Sunday morning the groin was very sore and hurt with each step.  At 1pm each Sunday I met the trainer at the field house, and we began therapy. Therapy was mainly hot water, ultrasound and an occasion shot. This continued through the week.  My workout was limited to mainly running in straight lines.  By Friday I felt fairly good.  Saturday, we started the routine over.

No one ever said anything, but I know I disappointed a lot of people that year.

After the season ended there was one more chapter.  In December.  I was called by the Head Coach.  He said a scout for the Pittsburgh Steelers wanted to talk to me.  They gave me the number.  I called him.  The scout was a nice gay, and we had a series of conversations.  I kept wondering why anyone in their right mind would offer a free agent contract to anyone that had such a disastrous season.  Finally, during a conversation, he said that they were looking for a running back that was over 200 pound and had sub 10 flat speed.  So, at 210 with 9.7 speed, I got in the door.

I had a conflict.  Although the money was good, there were a lot of negatives – I would have needed surgery, I would have left college without a degree, and statistically the chances of me making the team were not good.  

My coaches did not try to influence me but my dad wanted me to sign the contract.  Finally, I told dad that I was going to engineering school and my football days were behind me.

I spent 2 ½ year at UT and 3 year at UC Berkeley and never attended a football game. During the past 50 years, I may have watched 6 games on TV.  I loved playing football but watching is just not the same.

I wonder why I keep having my dream.

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