COURTHOUSE SQUARE SURVEY MARKER INSTALLATION

HCIDA Courthouse Endowment Board

announces installation of survey markers indicating the property boundaries

determined by recent survey of the Harrison County Courthouse Square

The Harrison County Industrial Development Authority (HCIDA) Board of Directors, most commonly referred to as the Courthouse Endowment Board, shared that the official survey markers connected with the recent HCIDA-funded survey of the property associated with the 1901 restored Harrison County Courthouse and Courthouse Square in downtown Marshall, will be installed on Thursday, July 9.

These 4-inch brass survey markers will designate the official corners and property boundaries of the Courthouse Square owned by Harrison County.

The survey of the property associated with the 1901 restored Harrison County Courthouse and Courthouse Square was recommended by the Texas Historical Commission (THC) earlier this year. The 9-member volunteer HCIDA Board voted in February to fund the survey in order to confirm the property boundaries. The survey was done in coordination with Harrison County.

Mark Patheal of MTX Surveying performed the survey, which was funded and managed by the HCIDA Board and volunteer Harrison Courthouse Manager.  Funded by the Courthouse endowment, the survey was carried out at no cost to the taxpayers of Harrison County.

Christina Anderson, president of the HCIDA Board of Directors, shared:  “We look forward to sharing with the Commissioners Court, the Texas Historical Commission, and our community the final results of the survey and the final survey report once the markers are installed and the survey is certified. It will be exciting to be able to share a definitive determination of the property boundaries not only for our community’s current purposes but also for all future purposes going forward.”

Ms. Anderson added that the HCIDA Board has kept Judge Chad Sims and the Commissioners Court, as well as the Texas Historical Commission, apprised of every aspect of the progress of the survey throughout the process.

The survey was informed by extensive historical research, legal analysis, and the compilation of relevant historical documents dating back to 1841, carried out by former Harrison County Judge Richard Anderson, who now serves in a volunteer capacity as Harrison Courthouse Manager, working with the HICDA Board in accomplishing the Board’s two-fold mission and work.

Created in 2010, the HCIDA Board of Directors has a two-fold mission a) to preserve, protect, and grow the Courthouse endowment which was established by the Commissioners Court in 2009 after the completion of the restoration of the 1901 Courthouse and b) to assist Harrison County with the ongoing preservation of the restored 1901 Harrison County Courthouse in perpetuity.

In 2009, after the completion of the restoration of the 1901 Courthouse, the Courthouse endowment was proposed and structured by then-County Judge Richard Anderson through the sale of historic tax credits and approved by the Commissioners Court.

The County transferred the proceeds from the sale of the historic tax credits in order to establish a Courthouse endowment which was created to assist the County with the ongoing preservation of the restored 1901 Courthouse in perpetuity so that the Courthouse would never go into disrepair again. As part of the HCIDA Board’s two-fold mission, the HCIDA Board has invested and managed the endowment funds so that they continue to grow for the purpose of assisting the County with the ongoing Courthouse preservation.

In recent years, in addition to the Courthouse Square survey in 2020, the HCIDA Board of Directors has carried out six other permanent improvement-related projects on the restored 1901 Courthouse. These projects include a Conditions Assessment of the restored building in 2015 to establish the permanent improvement needs going forward, as well as re-painting and repair of all exterior windows and doors of the Courthouse, the repainting of the area around the interior rotunda, replacing and installing UV-resistant sealant on the Courthouse and surrounding sidewalks, repainting the exterior handrails, and re-upholstering the 14 jury chairs in the historic courtroom.

These HCIDA projects have totaled approximately $95,000. All projects were funded and managed by the volunteer HCIDA Board and volunteer Courthouse Manager at no cost to the taxpayers of Harrison County. The Courthouse endowment is the only Courthouse endowment of its kind in the state of Texas.

The members of the HCIDA Board include Christina Anderson, President; Chief Reggie Cooper, Vice President, Veronica King, Secretary; Eric Neal, Treasurer; Dr. Blair Blackburn, Commissioner Jay Ebarb, Jack Redmon, Commissioner Zephaniah Timmins, and Amanda Wynn.

The HCIDA will share the results of the survey and more information about the process, as well as the historical research that informed the survey, once the survey is officially certified in the coming week.

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LISTEN UP

By George Smith

Listen up, Joe Biden! 

I am going to vote for you, no matter what, trusting you will, after inauguration, be choosing and working with a competent, qualified cast of cabinet and other confirmed and/or appointed aides and staff.

That said, my vote will be much easier if you agree to two conditions: 1. Choose either Susan Rice or Tammy Duckworth as your running mate; and, putting your impressive ego aside, make it clear you will only serve one term.

Face it, Joe, you are on the downhill side of elderly (78 in November); you’d be 82 before you could start your second term. Too old, okay? Too damn old.

Face it, you made a personal decision in 2014-15 not to run due to the death of your son. No one should second-guess your decision. But my opinion is, and always has been, if you had hit the primary trail against Hillary, you would be running for your second term as president now. Donald Trump did not win the presidency in 2016, Hillary Clinton lost it by assuming she was entitled to sit in the Oval Office, that her past service and resume was sufficient, that attention to detail and hard work was unnecessary.

All that aside, you have a chance to reset the Democratic Party clock by running a tight, smart race, beating the slobber jaws out of Ego Man and working at bringing the warring factions in America back to the table of compromise and bipartisan sanity in regard to programs and policies affecting a majority of citizens.

Do it. We need you, Joe, we need your experience, compassion, logical temperament  and basic sense of humanity and decency.

And, we need you to understand your limitations and unselfishly walk away at the end of one term, leaving the future to the next generation of leaders.

You have sacrificed much in the service of your country and those sacrifices will be your legacy.

Thank you for your service and thank you for ensuring the future of this nation by making the decisions necessary to rebuild trust in its institutions by every citizen.

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CORONAVIRUS INFO PROVIDED BY DR. JIM HARRIS – 6/28/2020

June 28, 2020

Three additional COVID-19 cases reported in countyThree additional COVID-19 cases reported in county
 
Marshall Manor announced Saturday that they now have 23 positive resident cases. The remaining staff and residents are anticipated to be tested on Monday.
 
The Strange Spectrum of Pandemic Response (good article and here are a few excerpts)
 
 I practice strict social distancing and remind my patients and their families to do the same. However, there are others in my state who are equally worried — but about their loss of civil liberties; they protest, refuse to wear masks, gather in crowds. Right now, I’m proud of the fact that my church has decided against holding in-person services, but there are also others in my church railing against this very decision. I think my church leaders are acting with great wisdom; others think that they are acting out of lost faith. I practice strict social distancing and remind my patients and their families to do the same. However, there are others in my state who are equally worried — but about their loss of civil liberties; they protest, refuse to wear masks, gather in crowds. Right now, I’m proud of the fact that my church has decided against holding in-person services, but there are also others in my church railing against this very decision. I think my church leaders are acting with great wisdom; others think that they are acting out of lost faith.
 
At my most tired, most burnt out, and most frustrated, I am pounding out angry words on my laptop: How can people think this pandemic is a hoax?! Face coverings are not and shouldn’t be a political statement!! Why are people hanging out in bars without masks!? Do they not care that there are hundreds of thousands of people dying from this!? Their reckless behavior is an affront to all health care workers — why are they fighting against our fight!?At my most tired, most burnt out, and most frustrated, I am pounding out angry words on my laptop: How can people think this pandemic is a hoax?! Face coverings are not and shouldn’t be a political statement!! Why are people hanging out in bars without masks!? Do they not care that there are hundreds of thousands of people dying from this!? Their reckless behavior is an affront to all health care workers — why are they fighting against our fight!?
 
I’m not sure I can say, with cold facts and hard evidence, that my worries and my responses are more rational and reasonable than those of others who think and act differently from me. However, our different perspectives and priorities seem to have shaped our pandemic response styles and pitted us against each other in some way that I fear will be detrimental when it comes to this pandemic: less solidarity, widening rifts between groups of people, more infections, more lives lost.

Evelyn Lai is a pediatric nurse practitioner with a B.A. in English Literature and a M.S. in Narrative Medicine. Evelyn has written both academically and creatively and believes strongly in the power of stories. She has no conflicts of interests. Evelyn is a 2019-2020 Doximity Fellow.I’m not sure I can say, with cold facts and hard evidence, that my worries and my responses are more rational and reasonable than those of others who think and act differently from me. However, our different perspectives and priorities seem to have shaped our pandemic response styles and pitted us against each other in some way that I fear will be detrimental when it comes to this pandemic: less solidarity, widening rifts between groups of people, more infections, more lives lost.

Evelyn Lai is a pediatric nurse practitioner with a B.A. in English Literature and a M.S. in Narrative Medicine. Evelyn has written both academically and creatively and believes strongly in the power of stories. She has no conflicts of interests. Evelyn is a 2019-2020 Doximity Fellow.

 
.Some aquatic mammals at the zoo escaped. It was otter chaos!

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News from the Blue Frog Restaurant – 6/17/2020

Dear Friends of Blue Frog Restaurant and Catering,

 

As we continue to evolve around and with the pandemic we want to provide you with some exciting updates!

 

BEGINNING Wednesday, June 17th we will offer our new LUNCH MENU (to go only) with the addition of DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS (to-go only) from 11am-2pm Monday – Friday.   The new menu with your timeless favorites can be found on our Face Book Page or give us a call to receive an email or text copy.   Daily lunch specials will also be offered as DINNER TO GO for your family of 2 or 4 (Dinner in a Bag).  Order by 2:30 pm and dinner will be packaged family style for pick up between 3:30 – 5:30 each day.

 

Blue Frog Market Frig, take and bake, grab and go items open Monday – Saturday 10am – 5:30 pm.  We are still offering curbside delivery for our guests who are not comfortable walking in.   

 

Blue Frog Catering remains open for your small or large group needs, personal chef events, special order bakery and food items.   Call or email us 903-923-9500 The Frog, 903-926-0836 Shawne (direct), bluefroggrill101@gmail.com.

 

The Alley Downtown (our outdoor dining area) will continue to announce evening dining events and/or live music events on a weekly basis through our face book page The Blue Frog.  Also a great way to keep up with daily specials and changes.

 

Blue Frog Gift Cards are a great way to show your support for our business and are available for purchase.   Give us a call or drop by the store.

 

Thank you so much for sticking with us. We have exciting things in the works and look forward to supporting each other during these challenging times.

 

Cheers,

Shawne Somerford

MARSHALL JUNE SALES TAX REPORT CITY OPENINGS

[Marshall, Texas, June 16, 2020]

On Wednesday, June 10, 2020, the City of Marshall received the June sales tax report. “I am happy to say that our overall report was lower than the previous year but better than we expected. However, we still have additional budgetary concerns moving forward,” expressed City Manager Mark Rohr.

As a result of the recent returns, the City of Marshall will enact the following provisions:

  • The Marshall Public Library will open at 50% of its total occupancy on Monday, June 22, 2020. The modified hours of operation for the library will be Monday-Friday 9:30 am-5:30 pm. To maintain social distance, a limited number of computers will be available with adequate spacing between units. Children’s interactive exhibits and games will be closed at this time to follow best practices. Patrons may still take advantage of curbside service to protect the most vulnerable populations.

  • The following city employees will return from furlough: two library employees and the Main Street Manager on June 22, 2020.

  • Effective immediately, the Human Resources department has posted employment opportunities for one police officer, one firefighter, and two ROW staff.

  • The City of Marshall will continue to hold City Commission meetings utilizing a video and audio conferencing tool and a standard conference call.  Instructions and direct links to view meetings or speak during Citizen Comment are athttp://www.marshalltexas.net.

“The City of Marshall is not in the clear yet, and all other budgetary modifications will remain in effect. Our revenue is still down compared to 2019, as we have trended downward for the last three months.  However, I believe the adjustments we have made have prepared the city well for what the rest of the year might bring as we await the July report. I am thankful for the discipline shown by the citizens and city staff as we face the challenges the pandemic has presented to us,” stated City Manager Rohr.

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CORONAVIRUS INFO PROVIDED BY DR. JIM HARRIS – 6/14/2020

June 14, 2020

SELECTED AREA DAILY COVID HOSPITAL CENSUS:
 
AREA AVG CENSUS CURRENT
MARSHALL/TYLER/LONGVIEW 46 54
DALLAS 569 729
AUSTIN 61 121
HOUSTON 480 681
STATE 1670 2242
     
So in Area G which included Marshall, there are currently 54 COVID hospitalizations. The average since 8 April for this area is 46. Or look at Austin: they have doubled their average. So, folks, it ain’t over yet; it ain’t even close. Wear your mask.
 
To download an Excl spreadsheet for the whole state click: 
COVID-19 Hospitalizations over Time by Trauma Service Area (TSA) – Updated Daily (Last updated: 6/13/2020)

This Excel files contains daily hospitalization counts by TSA, beginning April 8, 2020.

 
 
J. Harris: Fascinating and readable article about Vaccines — informative! I also must hope that an efficient antiviral drug will be found or developed sooner. 
 
“In the history of medicine, rarely has a vaccine been developed in less than five years…
… In virology labs…, we try to identify the viral proteins that a vaccine might target, usually the protein that recognizes and attaches to the host-cell receptor. All coronaviruses have a so-called spike protein, which is what gives the virus its corona-like morphology, the “crownlike shape,” as can be visualized in an electron microscope. To invade a cell, the spike protein attaches to a receptor — another protein, usually — on the cell’s outer membrane. This eventually results in the genetic material of the virus, in this case, an RNA protein complex, being internalized in the cell. And once that happens, replication can begin and a person can get sick. If you can identify the viral protein that interacts with the cellular receptor, then you can try to create a vaccine. This spike protein represents a particularly attractive candidate for a vaccine, because it is a protein that most prominently sticks outside of the surface of the virus, and so it’s the part of the virus that is most visible to the immune system.
 
…But we don’t just need a vaccine that works; we need one that can be reliably scaled up to manufacture in very large volumes. Ideally, it would be one that doesn’t require multiple doses to be effective, certainly not beyond, say, a two-dose regimen. And ideally it wouldn’t require refrigerated storage, so it can be made more available in resource-poor settings. So, there are characteristics of a vaccine in addition to safety and efficacy that are going to matter…”
 
 Something new:  ANTIBODY COCKTAILS: ..”.You can almost think of it as a temporary vaccine. Instead of waiting for a vaccine that will make the body make its own antibodies against the virus, we can make exactly those kinds of antibodies and inject them into people…”
 
 
A readable article that discusses “Reproduction Number” and the anticipation that cold weather will prolong our first phase (and bring a little flu at the same time).
 
 
Collins Pun: Two Eskimos sitting in a kayak were chilly, so they lit a fire in the craft.  Unsurprisingly it sank, proving once again that you can’t have your kayak and heat it too.
 
Really Bad Joke for today:  Geology rocks but Geography is where it’s at!

 
 

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LET’S TALK SYMBOLISM

By George Smith

“Symbolism is the use of symbols to signify ideas and qualities, by giving them symbolic meanings that are different from their literal sense. Symbolism can take different forms. Generally, it is an object representing another, to give an entirely different meaning that is much deeper and more significant.”

Great writers and poets often use symbolism as illustrations to present a message that may not be altogether clear.

For example, was Herman Melville’s Moby Dick really a great white whale or a symbol for something in that era’s society?

In the “Rime of the Ancient Mariner,” an albatross is the symbol of a burden the man must bear for his action.

President Donald Trump, or someone putting words in his tweeter,is a master symbolist.

On June 19th (Juneteenth), Trump is having a rally in Tulsa. In case you are isolated and clueless, June 19, in many states, is celebrated as Emancipation Day.

In Tulsa, Juneteenth is remembered for a very different reason: In June 1921, the Tulsa Race Massacre claimed the lives of an estimated 300 African Americans.

According to Human Rights Watch, “More than 1,200 houses and 35 square blocks were destroyed in just one day. By the end of the massacre, the area known as Black Wall Street was decimated, and photos showed Black people lying dead in the street.”

Trump knows this history. In a statement, Trump campaign adviser ⁦Katrina Pierson defended the move.

“As part of the party of Lincoln, Republicans are proud of the history of Juneteenth, which is the anniversary of the last reading of the Emancipation Proclamation,” Pierson wrote.

Sure. Okay. Why Tulsa? Just why?

It’s symbolism of the most crass degree: Look what happened in Tulsa 99 years ago, and the president is holding a rally to push his re-election there… why?

Symbol 2: It was announced recently the 2020 Republican National Convention to designate Trump as the GOP nominee again was being moved from North Carolina to Florida, to Jacksonville to be precise. The date set aside for the start is August 27.

Ironically, perhaps, that date is the anniversary of the ax handle and baseball bat beatings of peaceful black protestors staging a “dine-in” at a city cafeteria.

The brutal attack that became known as “Ax Handle Saturday” occurred that infamous Saturday, The Youth Council of the NAACP was participating in a peaceful protest, sitting at a whites- only lunch counter until they were spit on and attacked.

Authorities stood idly by until members of a black street gang called “The Boomerangs” tried to help those being attacked, at which point some members of the police joined in the beatings.

The victims of the attacks ran to a nearby church, finding sanctuary, until the mob disappeared.

Does Trump know the history of these dates? To think that he does not would assume this administration is operating  in a vacuum, or wants to ingratiate itself with white supremacists, racists and bigots. Or both.

Symbolism can be useful … and telling.
Trump’s use of symbolism in these two cases illustrates he is catering to his white’s-only-need-apply agenda and skewed picture of how he views America.

All believers of what America should stand for in these turbulent times should pray for a better tomorrow where race is not used as a wedge to divide the nation.

CORONAVIRUS INFO PROVIDED BY DR. JIM HARRIS – 6/5/2020

June 5 2020

Harrison County Judge Chad Sims reported, on Thursday, one new COVID-19 related death for the county, two new positive cases and 28 recoveries.
 
Judge Sims noted that of the 258 overall positive cases for the county, 26 have ended in death, and 125 have recovered, for a total of 107 current active cases.
 
Sims applauded Marshall Manor Nursing and Rehab on the good news the facility shared, also on Thursday, regarding their COVID-free test results.
 
After Reopening Schools, Israel Orders Them To Shut If COVID-19 Cases Are Discovered
 
Two weeks after Israel fully reopened schools, a COVID-19 outbreak sweeping through classrooms — including at least 130 cases at a single school — has led officials to close dozens of schools where students and staff were infected. A new policy orders any school where a virus case emerges to close.
 
Dr. Arnon Afek, who is helping manage Israel’s coronavirus response, played down the outbreak, saying a spike in cases was expected when schools reopened. “It wasn’t a surprise,” he said. “It happened also in South Korea and Singapore.”
 
J.Harris: This is an almost unreadable summary comparing many ways of getting oxygen to COVID patients. Ventilator injury is discussed. At any rate, worldwide studies are underway comparing the best ways to ventilate these patients. Likely, there will still be several efficacious ways to deliver oxygen to COVID patients depending on the circumstances and the local.
 
“…helmet NIV is able to deliver higher levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) to improve oxygenation, reduce inspiratory effort,13 and possibly render spontaneous breathing noninjurious.14 However, the certainty of the evidence supporting helmet NIV compared with all other modes of noninvasive oxygen support is low due to the limited number of available published clinical trials and small number of participants.”
 
J. Harris: A readable article that discussed vaccine development, volunteer programs, and potential differences in the degree of immunity that might be provided to various age groups. This is a good time to be young. 
 
TODAY’S COLLINS PUN: I wondered why the baseball kept getting bigger. Then it hit me
 

TIMELY AND PERSONAL

By George Smith

Cleon Flanagan is an American, a husband, father, production engineer, and former law enforcement officer. He is my son-in-law and dad to Bryan, 17, Brayden, 11, and Marley, 6, three of my seven grandchildren.

He is black.

He and I talked this weekend about the racial turmoil roiling through the U.S. His heart was breaking and it was obvious he was worried about the future and what new hell his biracial children would face.

So you will know, I grew up in a segregated community and never had a real, honest conversation and exchange of views about anything with any black person until I went to college. 

Cleon is the epitome of what a husband, father, relative and human being should be. He is one of the best men I have ever met. I love him.

He wrote the piece below this week. Please read it. If you do and get through it without shedding tears…you have more self control than I do. 

By Cleon Flanagan

So let’s talk … take a seat.

1980’s—Walking home, around age 12, and two white men in a pickup truck and a confederate flag waving, pulled up behind me and then beside me and threw beer and full beer cans on and at me.  Thank God I was almost home.  

1997  — When I worked for a local police agency, we were doing a transport of some detainees and prisoners when a detainee turned to me and said (while i was in uniform) “My daddy used to own some like you. ha ha!”  I couldn’t speak up. 

Same town — I went into the store to get a drink, in uniform, and the cashier looked at me (missed the badge) and said “I can’t stand f-ing n******.”

I’d like to say these instances early in my adulthood were rare, or stopped as I aged.

But that would be a “No.” 

Jennifer Thurman Flanagan and I, throughout our marriage, have endured comments that we know wouldn’t be made (or tolerated) about white couples.

“Oh, I’ll bet her family has money.  You’re all set now.”

“She has a good job so y’all know y’all will be ok. (But I’m an engineer?)

Jen has been asked if all of our kids were by the same dad.  

They are struck by the fact that she had actually graduated college, got married, and bought a house (in that order) yearsssssss before having kids.  That we weren’t teen parents.

She’s been asked at the grocery store, when the little ones were with her, if she’ll be using her Lone Star card to pay.  

She’s looked at as trash when she shops alone with our kids, but I get stereotyped as having “married up.”

And let me tell you about our recent vacations … Galveston 2019 — Our kids were questioned for missing fishing poles from a residence AN ENTIRE BLOCK AWAY.  The police were driving around and saw our kid’s fishing (with their own poles). 

Lake O the Pines 2018 — The white man who owned the property we rented was as friendly and sweet as peach pie over the phone… until he saw Bryan, his black classmate, and me heading in with our boat.  After that, we were harassed, watched, hounded, then, after cleaning profusely, he kept our deposit and sent us a bill (we got it all back after filing a complaint with VRBO).  

Speaking of vacations — How many of you have to plan your vacation depending on the demographics of the town?  The location?  Is it a place notorious for pulling over and harassing POC (people of color)?

Have you every had to justify simply being in a public place?  

Have you every been denied a day off by your boss at Thanksgiving, just for him to tell you, “Them white folks don’t want you to eat with them.”

These are only a fraction of the stories I could tell.  Imagine all of the stories millions black men and women could tell today.  

Imagine being a black man and being ridiculed and belittled by police, by your boss, by your white neighbor. treated less than human, in front of your own children who don’t understand the systematic racism that you encounter. 

And you are helpless to fight it.  You have to “stay in your place.”  You can’t speak up. 

If you think the world still doesn’t look at us differently, let me tell you:  I have a CHI (Concealed Handgun License), and I could open carry.  If I walked into Walmart with a rifle strapped to my back, the cops would be called.  White men open carry regularly – not an eye batted.  

Have you every had to tell your black son where to put his hands when he gets pulled over and to let the officer know he are unarmed?

Some of y’all get excited about your kids going off to college, traveling the world, getting jobs ANYWHERE.  That worries the hell out of me.  I don’t get the privilege to get excited for my kids — I just get to worry. 

The only reason I’m posting this is because I need y’all to understand. I have tons of white friends. I have white family members. But I really think that some don’t understand the experiences that we go through. They make assumptions that our life is great and happy and everyone is nice to us.  I’ve heard the sideways comments from people and either they think it doesn’t bother me, or they make the comment of “But you’re not like other black guys.“ What does THAT mean??

THIS IS OUR EVERYDAY REALITY!

This impacts me personally not because of my experiences that I have had or will have, but because of the experiences that my children will have. Racism is only around today because it keeps being reinforced and taught throughout the generations.  And now, it’s my kids’ turns to encounter it. And it INFURIATES ME.  

What if George Floyd was Bryan. Or our classmates, or me????

Like I was told at the police academy: Just because it happens in a big town, don’t think it can’t happen in your small piece of the world.  

Would you still sit back silent?  Would we just be a hashtag?  

Would you be complaining about protestors and rioting … or would you march for me? Would you actually act?  Would you vote differently?  Would you not make assumptions?  Would you still grasp your purse or lock your doors when we walk by?  Would we still get an interview, the job, or a promotion? 

Would you stand next to us?  

And, does it have to be someone you know for you to GET IT!?

Are you mad at the protesters?  Be mad that y’all haven’t spoken up in the names of my sons. Be mad at the systematic racism that is still plagues the every day life of POC. 

If we keep going this way, if Y’ALL DONT SPEAK UP and make SYSTEMATIC CHANGES, then it very well really might BE one of us.

Or maybe that’s it: You don’t want it to change. And THAT is the real problem.

 

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CORONAVIRUS INFO PROVIDED BY DR. JIM HARRIS – 5/29/2020

May 29, 2020

COVID REPORT HARRISON COUNTY RECEIVED THURSDAY AFTERNOON FROM MNM
In Harrison County, County Judge Chad Sims reported two more COVID-19 diagnoses on Thursday, bumping his county’s total to 242 cases. He said the county also saw nine more recoveries, raising that total to 80. 
 
The Gregg County Jail’s daily report for Thursday to the Texas Commission on Jail Standards shows the county’s number of inmates who have tested positive now totals 42. The report shows that two jailers have tested positive.
 
In Titus County, the 77 additional cases push that county’s total to 443, the state health department reported. The county has had two deaths from the virus.
 
 
UPDATE: SURFACE TRANSMISSION LESS IMPORTANT:
But while those experiments show how germs can spread on surfaces, the microbe still has to survive long enough and in a large enough dose to make you sick. Eugene M. Chudnovsky, a professor at the City University of New York, notes that surfaces are not a particularly effective means of viral transmission. With the flu, for instance, it takes millions of copies of the influenza virus to infect a person through surface-to-hand-to-nose contact, but it may take only a few thousand copies to infect a person when the flu virus goes from the air directly into the lungs.
 
“I believe the C.D.C. is right when it says that surface transmission is not a dominant one,” said Dr. Chudnovsky. “Surfaces frequently touched by a large number of people, like door handles, elevator buttons, etc., may play a more significant role in spreading the infection than objects touched incidentally, like food packages delivered to homes.”
 
The bottom line is that the best way to protect ourselves from coronavirus — whether it’s surface transmission or close human contact — is still social distancing, washing our hands, not touching our faces and wearing masks.
 
MORE GOOD NEWS FROM NYT: I may have some trouble doing this, but take out food, food in general, is safe if you can avoid crowds of people while you acquire it. Good reassuring article. J. Harris
 
JHH: Very good article with early reports about wearable monitoring devices that might give early warning of impending or incipient COVID.  However, I think I’ll use the oximeter and pulse detector that I already have purchased for about $60. I can watch my oxygen level as well as my pulse and not fiddle with a  bunch of new devices that I can’t read anyway. If my oxygen goes down and my pulse goes us, I’m in trouble. I tried to join the Duke study mentioned in the article, but I couldn’t sign the damn consent with a computer. 
 
Excerpts:
On Thursday, researchers at WVU’s Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute reported that Oura ring data, combined with an app to measure cognition and other symptoms, can predict up to three days in advance when people will register a fever, coughing or shortness of breath. It can even predict someone’s exact temperature, like a weather forecast for the body.
 
There’s more: Researchers at Stanford University studying changes in heart rate from Fitbits tell me they’ve been able to detect the coronavirus before or at the time of diagnosis in 11 of 14 confirmed patients they’ve studied. In this initial analysis, they could see one patient’s heart rate jump nine days before the person reported symptoms. In other cases, they only saw evidence of infection in the data when patients noticed symptoms themselves.
 
(Apple watchers are also discussed)
 
SUMMARY:

In this cross-sectional study, 10 of 60 patients previously diagnosed with and treated for COVID-19 had RT-PCR test results positive for SARS-CoV-2 from 4 to 24 days after index hospital discharge. As discharged patients were provided with home isolation instructions and local cases were rare, their positive results were presumed to be persistent viral shedding rather than reinfection. Consistent with previous studies showing prolonged viral shedding in the feces of patients with COVID-19,4 our results indicated that 6 patients had persistent viral shedding in the gastrointestinal tract after hospital discharge, including 1 patient (patient 2) who had positive results in both samples and showed RT-PCR positivity on March 27, 2020, a viral shedding duration of 56 days from illness onset. Lower threshold cycle values with anal swabs than those with nasopharyngeal swabs were identified in this study; however, the infectivity remains unclear, as infectious viruses have not been isolated from stool samples, to our knowledge.5

This study was limited to a small number of discharged patients who had test results positive for SARS-CoV-2. Further studies using a larger cohort and isolation of the viable virus instead of RT-PCR testing are needed to define infectivity for continued disease management after hospital discharge.

Considering the RT-PCR positivity for SARS-CoV-2 among discharged patients with COVID-19 revealed by this and a previous study,2 appropriate personal protective equipment for medical staff might be important while collecting convalescent plasma, and the effects of convalescent plasma from clinically recovered patients with persistent viral shedding may need to be evaluated separately.

JHH: At the least,  the above small study indicates that people who have had Covid and have been treated or observed may remain contagious for a period of time yet to be determined; they might also become reinfected. 
 
COLLINS PUN FOR THE DAY:  Time flies like an arrow. Fruit flies like a banana.

 
 


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