City of Marshall New Declaration of Local Disaster — May 19, 2020

[Marshall, Texas, May 19, 2020]

[Marshall, Texas] Mayor Terri Brown has issued a New Declaration of Local Disaster and Public Health Emergency Related to Communicable Disease on May 19, 2020. The declaration shall continue in effect until the Marshall City Commission terminates its consent to the continuation of this declaration or until the Mayor terminates this declaration, whichever occurs first.  This declaration is a direct reflection of Executive Order GA-23 issued by Governor Greg Abbott on May 18, 2020.

Valid immediately on May 18, 2020, these local orders allow the following openings:

  • Massage establishments and other facilities where licensed massage therapists or other persons licensed or otherwise authorized to practice under Chapter 455 of the Texas Occupations Code, provided all facilities must ensure at least six feet of social distancing between operating work stations.
  • Tattoo studios, piercing studios, hair removal services, and hair loss treatment and growth services, provided all facilities must ensure at least six feet of social distancing between operating work stations.
  • Child-care services other than youth camps as described below.

Starting at 12:01 a.m. on Friday, May 22, 2020, in Marshall:

  • Dine-in restaurant services may operate at up to 50 percent of the total listed occupancy of the restaurant; provided, however, this applies only to restaurants that have less than 51 percent of their gross receipts from the sale of alcoholic beverages. Interactive functions or exhibits, including child play areas, interactive games, and video arcades, must remain closed.
  • Bars and similar establishments that hold a permit from the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission may operate at up to 25 percent of the total listed indoor occupancy of the establishment. Interactive functions or exhibits, including child play areas, interactive games, and video arcades, must remain closed.
  • Aquariums, natural caverns, and similar facilities (excluding zoos) may operate at up to 25 percent of the total listed occupancy or, for outdoor areas, at up to 25 percent of the standard operating limits as determined by the facility owner if permitted by the city. Interactive functions or exhibits, including child play areas, must remain closed.
  • Bowling alleys, bingo halls, simulcast racing to the extent authorized by state law, and skating rinks may operate at up to 25 percent of the total listed occupancy of the establishment; provided bowling alleys must ensure at least six feet of social distancing between operating lanes. Video arcades must be closed.
  • Rodeos and equestrian events may operate at up to 25 percent of the facility’s total listed occupancy or, for outdoor areas, up to 25 percent of the standard operating limits as determined by the facility owner. This policy does not permit a larger gathering, such as county fairs, where such an event is not authorized.
  • Drive-in concerts, under guidelines that facilitate appropriate social distancing, that generally require spectators to remain in their vehicles, and that minimize in-person contact between people who are not in the same household or car.
  • Amateur sporting events are eligible where there is no access to the general public allowed. All participants have tested negative for COVID-19 before the event. Participants are to be quarantined for the duration of the game, temperature-checked and monitored for symptoms daily, and tested again for COVID-19 at the end.

Starting at 12:01 a.m. on Sunday, May 31, 2020, in Marshall:

  • Youth camps, including but not limited to those defined as such under Chapter 141 of the Texas Health and Safety Code, and including all summer camps and other daytime and overnight camps for youths.
  • Youth sports programs may begin practice on May 31, 2020, with only one parent or guardian in attendance and maintaining social distancing at each practice. Youth sports games may commence on June 15, 2020. At all games, spectators should avoid being in a group larger than ten individuals and maintain social distancing.

The City of Marshall “New Declaration of Local Disaster and Public Health Emergency” dated May 19, 2020, the City of Marshall maintains the requirement for food establishments within the city limits to have all employees wear a face mask at all times. Separate employees must perform cash handling functions and food serving functions.

In providing or obtaining essential services or reopened services, individuals and businesses should follow the minimum standard health protocols recommended found at www.dshs.texas.gov/coronavirus. As COVID-19 positive tests continue to rise, residents should implement social distancing, use recommended hand sanitizing, and maintain environmental cleanliness. Individuals are encouraged to wear appropriate face coverings.

The City of Marshall will perform inspections to verify the proper implementation of all policies and procedures. Failure to comply with any of the mandated provisions of this Order constitutes an imminent threat to public health. Per Texas Government Code §418.173, a person who knowingly or intentionally violates this Order commits an offense punishable by a fine up to $1,000.00. Each violation shall constitute a separate offense.

Best practices to prevent the spread of COVID-19 include:

  1. Restrict physical contact and publicly used areas.
  2. Maintain Social Distancing with a safe distance of six (6’) feet between all individuals.
  3. Every person shall avoid large gatherings.
  4. Residents shall not visit nursing homes, retirement, or long-term care facilities unless to provide critical assistance.
  5. Regularly wash hands with warm soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  6. Avoid touching eyes, nose, or mouth.
  7. If soap is not available, use at least a 60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  8. Avoid close contact with people who are sick. All persons should remain in the house if one person in the home exhibits symptoms.

GIVE US YOUR FEEDBACK.  CLICK ON “COMMENT” TO TELL US WHAT YOU THINK or use one of the alternative methods for providing feedback.

click here to CLOSE THIS PAGE

CORONAVIRUS INFO PROVIDED BY DR. JIM HARRIS – 5/19/2020

May 19, 2020

COVID 19 TESTS MADE SIMPLE: FROM THE CDC
 
Harrison County Judge Chad Sims:
15 mins ·
May 18, 2020 – Today we have 3 new positive cases to report in Harrison County bringing our total to 212. Regrettably, I have to report 4 fatalities bringing that total to 19. We’ve also had 4 new recoveries totaling 34. That leaves our active case count at 159 cases.

Below is the weekly graphic prepared by our Health District. A related note in our fatalities, they have all occurred in the 60+ age group with an average age of 85 years old.

The Governor also spoke today at 2pm and announced some adjustments to his current orders. While the Governor has lifted some restrictions, I urge the proprietors and patrons of each business to make wise choices. Sick folks should stay home as well as those with any underlying illnesses. You may find details at the following website:
https://gov.texas.gov/organization/opentexas

As I mentioned, there are 4 families among us that have lost a loved one. Please continue to remember these families in your prayer time.

Testing for COVID-19

Other LanguagesPrint Page

Guidance on Interpreting COVID-19 Test Results pdf icon[610 KB]external icon: A guide for interpreting test results and determining what actions to take.

Two kinds of tests are available for COVID-19: viral tests and antibody tests.

  • A viral test tells you if you have a current infection.
  • An antibody test tells you if you had a previous infection.

An antibody test may not be able to show if you have a current infection, because it can take 1-3 weeks after infection to make antibodies. We do not know yet if having antibodies to the virus can protect someone from getting infected with the virus again, or how long that protection might last.

Who should be tested

To learn if you have a current infection, viral tests are used. But not everyone needs this test.

  • Most people will have mild illness and can recover at home without medical care and may not need to be tested.
  • CDC has guidance for who should be tested, but decisions about testing are made by state and localexternal icon health departments or healthcare providers.
  • If you have symptoms of COVID-19 and want to get tested, call your healthcare provider first.
  • You can also visit your state or local health department’s website to look for the latest local information on testing.
  • Although supplies of tests are increasing, it may still be difficult to find a place to get tested.
  •  
 
 

Tables produced by Edmund Wood.


GIVE US YOUR FEEDBACK.  CLICK ON “COMMENT” TO TELL US WHAT YOU THINK or use one of the alternative methods for providing feedback.

click here to CLOSE THIS PAGE