CORONAVIRUS INFO PROVIDED BY DR. JIM HARRIS – 7/29/2020

July 29, 2020

[Longview News-Journal] Longview mayor warns: COVID-19 cases will spike as schools reopen (A very realistic review of Longview’s Covid experience–Mayor Dr. Mack)

Judge Chad Sims reports 13 new COVID cases for Harrison County on Tuesday. 

From Johns Hopkins:1.Research reveals heart complications in COVID-19 patients“The first, an observational cohort study, involved 100 unselected coronavirus patients identified from the University Hospital Frankfurt COVID-19 Registry from April to June, 57 risk factor-matched patients, and 50 healthy volunteers.

“Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging revealed heart involvement in 78 patients and active cardiac inflammation in 60, independent of underlying conditions, disease severity, overall course of illness, and time from diagnosis to CMR…Thirty-three of 100 patients required hospitalization…
“Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging revealed heart involvement in 78 patients and active cardiac inflammation in 60, independent of underlying conditions, disease severity, overall course of illness, and time from diagnosis to CMR….Biopsy of the heart muscle in patients with serious findings showed ongoing immune-mediated inflammation.

“…The study authors noted that while most coronavirus research has focused on short-term respiratory complications, particularly in critically ill patients, mounting evidence suggests that COVID-19 has a significant impact on the cardiovascular system by worsening heart failure in patients with preexisting cardiac diseases.

J. Harris: A second study in the same report, both from Germany, demonstrated autopsy finding of some heart inflammation in 24 of 39 Covid patients who were, of course, deceased:
 … “The study authors noted that while most coronavirus research has focused on short-term respiratory complications, particularly in critically ill patients, mounting evidence suggests that COVID-19 has a significant impact on the cardiovascular system by worsening heart failure in patients with preexisting cardiac diseases.

“”Overt fulminant myocarditis has been reported in isolated patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection,” the authors wrote. “However, the current data indicate that the presence of SARS-CoV-2 in cardiac tissue does not necessarily cause an inflammatory reaction consistent with clinical myocarditis.
“…Cause of death was listed as pneumonia in 35 cases (89.7%), while the other four (10.2%) died of necrotizing fasciitis, cardiac decompensation with previous heart failure, bacterial bronchitis, or unknown causes. The most common underlying illnesses were coronary artery disease (32 [82.0%]), high blood pressure (17 [43.6%]), and diabetes (7 [17.9%]). Median patient age was 85 years, and 23 of 39 patients (59%) were women.”

(J. Harris: So the good news is that unless you’re old, fat, hypertensive, or have a gene defect or two, COVID probably won’t kill your heart. The bad news is that even in mild cases, many of which were mild enough not to require hospitalization,  there was still evidence of heart muscle involvement. Of course, no one knows yet if this level of heart damage will have long term consequences. Let’s look at it again in about ten years. The point is, medically, it appears most desirable not to catch COVID. Wear your masks, “space out,” and avoid crowds. I continue to assume that everyone with whom I come into contact with is infected, except my one weary household contact. I apologize for the length of this narrative, but I feel it is important).

Texas AG Ken Paxton says local health authorities can’t close schools

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton said in a guidance letter Tuesday that local health authorities can’t close schools for the sole purpose of preventing future COVID-19 infections.

Paxton said it’s up to school officials to decide whether, when and how to open schools, not local health authorities whose roles are “limited by statute to addressing specific, actual outbreaks of disease.”

“Education of our children is an essential Texas value and there is no current statewide order prohibiting any school from opening,” Paxton said in a statement. “While local health authorities may possess some authority to close schools in limited circumstances, they may not issue blanket orders closing all schools on a purely preventative basis. That decision rightfully remains with school system leaders.”

I got some batteries that were given out free of charge

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It’s hard when you lose your identity

By George Smith

I seem, at times, to be losing my identity. 

Who am I? What am I? Who cares who I am, what I am, where I have been and what I have done? 

In what seems like a lifetime ago, I was a journalist and, at that job, like every other I ever had (except for hauling hay and picking tomatoes), I tried to be the best I could be. 

There was a time when I felt defined by my work, which, to me, most of the time was never good enough. For more than 40 years I went to work at a newspaper here or there, determined to be the first person in history, the first editor and/or publisher to put out the perfect newspaper. Never happened and assuredly never will to any editor anywhere. 

Putting together a million characters or so into a publication within a 24-hour period without making a single mistake, without a single misplaced ‘ or , or – or misspelled word, is impossible. 

In the newspaper business you go to work knowing – KNOWING! – you are going to be less than perfect. That’s a reality of the situation. You just try to be the best you can be, and it’s never good enough. 

What is a journalist?

Gleaned down to the bare basics, a journalist is a chronicler of history, an objective viewer of events and the secretary of record for a community, town, region, state, national, world. What is written and printed, for the most part, never goes away. An error in an obituary in 1867 can determine whether or not kinfolks ever meet, whether a family hero is ever celebrated, whether an evil ancestor is ever discussed in whispers around a homecoming brunch.

 Journalists (particularly community scribes) cover everything from the ridiculous to the sublime, from births to deaths, from celebratory events to tragedies. And we are supposed to do it with an objective, all-seeing eye, one that rates events by the evaluated, subjective  importance to the communities we serve.  

We sit, we watch, we report, we take the hits for our product and we move on. 

In that part of my life where I closely identified with journalism, I have viewed horrendous tragedies (“Eight crushed in I-30 accident”), astonishing events (“Teenage couple has triplets”), ridiculous examples of decision making (“Sheriff sends all-white deputies to dispel black protestors”), a bevy of “Say-huh?” incidents (“Judges whacks lawyer with gavel”) and a few unintentional laughers (“Fast-draw deputy shoots self in leg – twice!”) 

While on the job, I covered the deadly actions of a serial killer, interviewed a real-life hermit in the 1970s, whose wife had run off with a Bible salesman “sometime in the ‘20s, I think it was,” and was threatened with death more than once if I printed a certain story. 

I was fortunate to interview many politicians. I wanted information and they all wanted good press; it was a give-and-take relationship and I would like to believe I got the better of the deals and that my readers gained the rewards. 

How crazy is the newspaper business? I once was threatened to receive “the beating of your life” by an irate man who didn’t like a picture I took of his dog. An elderly woman hit me with her crutch because “you screwed up my Harvey’s death notice.” The police once stopped a truckload of men in front of my house; they had shotguns and meant to do me harm. 

A politician once called me out as a liar at a rally (“fake news” claims are not new, folks) and called me up on stage so he could lambast me in person. Of course, he didn’t think I would come; of course, I did. He started upbraiding me but didn’t say much after I pulled out my pocket recorder and played the portion of the statement in which he denied ever saying. 

“Taken out of context!” he was screaming as the crowd started laughing. 

Reporters are not supposed to be part of the story. But, and this “but” is as big as a Wyoming sunset, sometimes it can’t be helped.

The point is: Good reporters and editors do the absolute best they can on every issue. And the readers are the benefactors.
 
And, if anyone, especially an elected official, cries “Fake news!” about any story, my money is that it is correct in every detail.

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CORONAVIRUS INFO PROVIDED BY DR. JIM HARRIS – 7/28/2020

July 28, 2020

MNM AND JUDGE SIMS SUMMARY FOR JUNE AND JULY

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Symptom Duration and Risk Factors for Delayed Return to Usual Health Among Outpatients with COVID-19 in a Multistate Health Care Systems Network — United States, March–June 2020
“…Most studies to date have focused on symptoms duration and clinical outcomes in adults hospitalized with severe COVID-19 (1,2). This report indicates that even among symptomatic adults tested in outpatient settings, it might take weeks for resolution of symptoms and return to usual health. Not returning to usual health within 2–3 weeks of testing was reported by approximately one third of respondents. Even among young adults aged 18–34 years with no chronic medical conditions, nearly one in five reported that they had not returned to their usual state of health 14–21 days after testing. In contrast, over 90% of outpatients with influenza recover within approximately 2 weeks of having a positive test result (7). Older age and presence of multiple chronic medical conditions have previously been associated with illness severity among adults hospitalized with COVID-19 (8,9); in this study, both were also associated with prolonged illness in an outpatient population…”

FROM JOHNS HOPKINS:1. Scent Dog Identification of Samples from COVID-19 Patients – A Pilot Study (BMC Infectious Diseases) Volatile organic compounds produced during respiratory infections can cause specific scent imprints, which can be detected by trained dogs with a high rate of precision. During the presentation of 1012 randomized samples, the dogs achieved an overall average detection rate of 94% (±3.4%) with 157 correct indications of positive, 792 correct rejections of negative, 33 incorrect indications of negative or incorrect rejections of 30 positive sample presentations.

2. PRESS RELEASENIST Launches Investigation of Face Masks’ Effect on Face Recognition Software. Now that so many of us are covering our faces to help reduce the spread of COVID-19, how well do face recognition algorithms identify people wearing masks? The answer, according to a preliminary study by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), is with great difficulty. Even the best of the 89 commercial facial recognition algorithms tested had error rates between 5% and 50% in matching digitally applied face masks with photos of the same person without a mask. (NIST, 7/27/20)
Covid-19 mask safety: Two or three layers best to protect against virus, study finds
The researchers really wanted to make two points: first, that something is probably better than nothing; and second, a two-layer mask is significantly better than a one-layer mask. And a surgical mask may be even a little better than that.
But none of these masks are perfect, so as a result — even if you’re wearing a surgical mask — there might be viral spread around the layers of those masks.

We know part of the reason masks became such an important tool is that people can spread this even when they’re asymptomatic. It means that masks become crucial whenever you are out and about, even if you feel healthy.

But we still need to maintain physical distance from people, even if you’re wearing masks. If you start to layer these things in — the physical distance, the hand washing and the masking — it can go a long way to prevent the virus from spreading.

What Will Schools Do When a Teacher Gets Covid-19?
Good opinion piece regarding school planning NOW.
Hygiene Theater Is a Huge Waste of Time
…By funneling our anxieties into empty cleaning rituals, we lose focus on the more common modes of COVID-19 transmission and the most crucial policies to stop this plague. “My point is not to relax, but rather to focus on what matters and what works,” Goldman said. “Masks, social distancing, and moving activities outdoors. That’s it. That’s how we protect ourselves. That’s how we beat this thing.”

I changed my iPod’s name to Titanic. It’s syncing now

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